Tag: beauty industry

Independent workers: When do we get unemployment?

Hair dressers, gig drivers, landscapers, freelancers and other independent contractors who work for themselves normally don’t qualify for unemployment benefits.  But these aren’t normal times.

The $2 trillion government stimulus program is supposed to finally give unemployment benefits for millions of self-employed people who do not pay into the unemployment compensation system as full-time employees do.  However, many of them are growing more nervous by the day as they wonder when they will see the money.  Laura Grant, like many people on furlough right now, is desperately trying to reach her state’s unemployment hotline to learn if she now qualifies for benefits. Grant is a hair stylist who manages a six-person salon called Beneath the Crown in Florence, Kentucky. All the employees are independent contractors who rent booths. She’s had no luck reaching a live person in Kentucky’s unemployment office. Every time she calls, thousands of other people are trying to do the same.  Hair salon workers, freelancers waiting for stimulus aid.

Laura Grant, like many people on furlough right now, is desperately trying to reach her state’s unemployment hotline to learn if she now qualifies for benefits.  Grant is a hair stylist who manages a six-person salon called Beneath the Crown in Florence, Kentucky. All the employees are independent contractors who rent booths.  She’s had no luck reaching a live person in Kentucky’s unemployment office. Every time she calls, thousands of other people are trying to do the same. She and her fellow stylists have tried filing online for unemployment benefits but have had no luck because they have no “employer.”  “I was able to fill it out, but in the employer section, I had to put ‘self employed,’ so it denied me,” she said. President Trump and state leaders have announced that the stimulus package specifically provides benefits for self-employed and gig workers, but these hair stylists and millions of other workers like them have yet to see it.  Workers at Beneath the Crown are praying it happens. Until it does, they’ll be facing down looming bills without any way to pay.  “It’s been two weeks and I haven’t had any income,” Grant said. “We all have car payments. There are a couple of single moms who work here, so we are all up in the air and we don’t know what to do.”

Kentucky’s unemployment office says self-employed workers should fill out the online forms anyway, and the state government will “fix the issue at the back end” when the federal money comes through. Other states are also telling independent workers to file, even if the form rejects them at this point.  Grant hopes it happens soon. In the meantime, she’s trying to live by the message in her lobby: “Think positive and positive things will happen.

Corporate Employment In The Beauty Industry Leads You Only To The Working Poor.

 

Working in a fully developing economy in the United States jobs are very plentiful.  Any one can go out and get a part time job or full time job with out education in the food service industry and come home with $13-$15 dollars a hour.  You can practically go into any restaurant and get $13.00 dollars a hour to start off with.  Which is good for a lot of people since they are in college or semi-retired people looking for added income.  But in the beauty industry the corporations are making the professionals the working class poor. Never in my mind would I have though these corporations would treat  beauty industry professionals with such little respect and poor wages. So many of these company’s will tell you they are for there employee’s, providing false medical insurance and lack of pay raises. Working for these corporations is the same as working in a sweat shop in China or a Asian nail salon in the U.S.

The chains salons and the franchised salons are pretty much the same when you go for employment. They give you a all caring “Gun Ho” lecture of how important you will be to the “TEAM”, the “TEAM” is the management and owners of the salons that are franchised. A all promising future you will have with there company and how much they care but in the end employment with these corporations they will chew you up and spit you out. Not caring about you as a employee, in here minds they know there will be another coming through the door in a few weeks to take your place when you quit.  You are just a number, that’s it a human body to make money and make you follow there rules. And not caring if you have any family, “Its all about the company”. But in there advertising they will let the public know its all about there employee’s.

If you are new to the beauty industry I would not recommend employment at the following company’s.

How many interviews I have done with fellow professionals who have worked at the above named company’s and have not had good experiences.  People have worked for years at Regis corporation and have not received pay increases. The same goes for anyone who has or now works for Great Clips. These company’s will force there employees to do a haircut service under 15 minutes, and will also time you on how long you take to sweep up your hair after a haircut service.  If these practices they teach and tell you to do are not met they will fire you.  I had a sit down with a former employee of Great Clips and was told to me that there was a academy were the owner of the franchised salon has to send you to learn the computer, hair designing methods and customer service skills required by the company. This was not given to her when she was hired and never got it.  But was required by Great Clips Corporation for all franchises owner to do for all new hires in there salon.  She was paid a minimum of 9.00 hourly and was told she could give herself raises by selling retail and talking customers into washing there hair for 4.00 extra. Most of the time she told me she would work on people who have not washed there hair in days and was filled with hair spray etc. The made for a very unclean atmosphere to work in.  But that’s Great Clips promising and not delivering. Twisting there words into falsehoods to there new employees.  While the whole time banking on your efforts, especially when they have $7.99 haircut specials that Great Clips has all the time.  You make no money but the owners do.

Split shifts were required of her but no compensation for gasoline. Her day would start off at a 10-2 shift and was let go and told to come back at 5-9 shift. And of course she lived in a area that was 45 minutes away, so what could she do sleep in her cat till the next shift. Again no compensation for gasoline to get back and forth. SAD!  These are the new times of corporations and how they make the beauty industry professional the “Working Class Poor”. Working a full time job with part-time pay will get you nowhere in this day and age except into debt.  So letting you know as a customer when you walk in to one of these establishments let it be known to you that the stylist is really working for tips. Because there wages date back take home pay from the 1980’s. These stylists are under a lot of stress to make money, and when you are in a atmosphere like that people are trying to get you in and out so they may take another client who has walked in and is waiting for there service. In that atmosphere there is a lot of “CAT FIGHT” on who gets the next client, and who is up next. People will skip one another for that extra client.  You the consumer will only get a 10-15minute haircut if you go to Great Clips. WHY? Because that is what the company wants.

So if you are a employee of one of these company’s 9.00 a hour times 30 hours weekly gives you 270.00 times 2 gives you 540.00 and then they take out for credit card tips, which gives you a bi-weekly salary of nothing.  They will not give you full time because they will not pay for your insurance. And they will also give you a “BS” story of how much more you can make but it is merely penny’s on the dollar.

You cannot make a living with these corporation. And they really don’t care if you do or not!

 

My Short Time At A Ulta Salon.

Two months ago I applied to a position at ULTA to see how the company is organized and how it treats its employees. And when I say employees I mean Hairdressers. A position was offered to me as a hairdresser from the company. And I accepted the offer and did not know how much I was to be offered, but assuming in the beauty industry it would be a low commission.  I started the first week in April as a hairdresser. ULTA provides all the tools a hairdresser needs without including shears. Shears are a personnel choice of all hairdressers. All the tools used where given to all to use since the company sells these name brand tools. You can provide what you want as long as the tools are what is being sold in the store for retail purchases to consumers. A lot of video training is provided to the stylist and a lot is expected of the stylist. Such as how to greet customers and direct them to the proper aisle to find there product they are shopping for. Mind you if you have a client in your chair you are to politely leave your client to help the consumer in the store to find there hair care needs and answer questions to them.  Also if you have a client in your chair you are to politely leave your client to answer the phone and make appointments. Which I feel professionally that is not good, especially if they are a new or returning client. There are no receptionists in the salon, but there are plenty of sales people in the store to help you with makeup and “RING UP” YOUR PURCHASES.

On my second week at the salon a employee who I worked next to had to go ahead a pick up there child at school because she was sick. A makeup appointment was then moved from her schedule to mine. I have been doing makeup for about 10 years so I thought to myself no big deal. But when the client came in she had a appointment with a stylist who also does makeup and had a full consultation on what would be used and types of color for her private. She informed me that she wanted the stylist who she originally talked to at the consultation and not me. I tried to calm her down but to no avails she did not need my services and wanted to know why the stylist she talked to was not there. I had no information for her and she then turned around and walked away. Tried to do my best I told myself. Also to let you know I had a customer in my chair while attending to this client also. So for ten minutes I had to take away from the paying customer.

She walked away and moved over to the makeup counters and soon got her service completed from a sales attendant for her function. I went back to her and gave her a managers card and asked her to call the manager if she needed to speak to someone. I also went to a store manager to explain the situation to her from my side. All seemed well. No information from my manager was given to me about the consultation she initially had, and no information on makeup color choices. NOTHING. If YOU ARE GOING TO MOVE A CLIENT FROM ONE STYLIST TO ANOTHER GIVE THEM THE CLIENT INFORMATION FROM THERE CONSULTATION. So things will run smoothly. Photo’s also help from the consultation. Later that evening when I was leaving for home another store manager came to me asking what had happened. I thought to myself who is this person nor did I know she was a store manager. Thinking to myself she must be looking for gossip I said it was none of her business. She came to me and said the other employees said I was very rude to her and would not accommodate her. That is when I noticed to myself there are a lot of chiefs here than employee’s.  I respectfully denied to answer her comments and the following day told my manager the whole situation. Nothing was ever done on the situation. Yes the salon manager had there favorites in the salon as per the industry. So you where at times pretty much left alone in the salon to clean and make appointments and play receptionist. You were not allowed to sit in your salon chair and had to sit in the back if you needed to get off your feet. Everything had to be in clear plastic bags so they could inspect when you came and also when you left the salon. I was told the meaning for the tight security of personal effects was there was a employee who would place makeup in there sandwich and leave with it. That person was using that technique to steal. I had once told a sales person on the floor she had lovely makeup and she could not even understand English. She latter told my salon manager that I was making fun of her makeup and that I would be written up. If something again came up. This is after 3 weeks mind you.

There were a few nice people to work with in the salon and you also had your “QUEEN’S” there also. I refer the them as “QUEEN’S” because there are the one’s who will smile in your face and then take all the clients that walk in. When you take a break or leave the store during or after your shift you must go to the front of the store and empty your pockets and be searched by a manager on duty to make sure you are not stealing. And it doesn’t matter if the store is busy it will be done in front of the customers. The search’s were done in front of a camera in the front of the store .Very, very embarrassing. That tells you something about the business.  I was hired as a hairdresser which meant to mean the had a position to fill in the salon. I brought some of my own clients to the salon which kept me busy for a short time but as time went on there was less and less business. I was told it would get slower because of the season. The store itself was only open for a 10 month period and not yet a year. I was told to upscale my tickets as much as possible and seen some stylists charge as much as $250.00 for a simple foil highlight. I was also told to go outside the store and bring in clients or customers. Even if that meant to stand in front of “TARGET” and give out salon business cards. To me that told me everything.  They did not have the business and wanted “YOU” a professional to go out and pretty much beg people to come in for serviced.  If a customer was walking around in the store especially in the hair product department, I was to help them find what they wanted but also at the same time “TALK” them in a conditioning treatment. Saying the product they were looking for was not as good as what the salon uses. Which was untrue we used the same products from the floor in the salon. SNEAKY!

After being asked to give out business cards in front of “TARGET” I knew this was not the place to build a clientele. That pretty much told me they were deceitful from the start and lied about the position they had for me. They had no business at all. And wanted me to beg for business. This is a old technique in the beauty industry to place on a professional and ask them, ‘Well how are you going to build a clientele, Joseph”. I told them by my work I will build a clientele. ULTA is a large corporation that can afford to advertise for there stores. But would rather go the cheap way of using the employees to do all the clientele building. If you have no business in the salon why would they hire me.  FREE LABOR!

I get paid to do hair, hair coloring, makeup etc. Not to go out and beg and lie to people to come into the salon. If you don’t have the business don’t waste peoples time. All in all if you are looking for a career in the beauty industry, I would highly recommend not going to ULTA, for any employment.  Professionals spend a lot of time in there craft and need to be respected, but in this day and age corporate business have prostituted the  beauty industry.

SAME SHIT DIFFERENT DAY!

 

The Value of Cosmetology Licensing

 All cosmetologists, barbers, manicurists, skin care specialists and makeup artists in America are trained and licensed beauty professionals from accredited cosmetology schools. Professional beauty programs offer courses to teach individuals skill sets to enhance clients’ appearances hair, nails, skin, and makeup and maintain a safe salon environment.
One of the most valuable features of all professional beauty programs ,from a comprehensive cosmetology program to a shorter nail technology program, is safety and sanitation training to minimize the transfer of infectious diseases and risk of accidents for clients. Upon completing their training, students who pass their exams are awarded certificates and licenses to work in hair salons, barber shops, nail salons, spas and other personal care service facilities. Currently, professional beauty licenses are set and administered by state offices and the requirements vary from state to state and specialty to specialty.
Among the various disciplines with in the beauty industry, cosmetologists and barbers usually undertake the most comprehensive programs that cover multiple teachings and skills from safety, sanitation and technical skills to customer and business management skills.  Full time programs in cosmetology and barbering range from 9 to 24 months and can lead to associate’s degrees in cosmetology. Professional cosmetology schools also offer shorter, more affordable programs such as nail treatment, skin care and hair styling designed to teach specific skills to work in the beauty industry. Upon completion of study, beauty professionals take exams to demonstrate their knowledge, skills, and capabilities required to perform their jobs. After passing required exams they are awarded with certificates and licenses to work at hair salons, barber shops, nail salons, spas, nursing facilities and performance art centers.
Registered professionals are proven to be accountable for the benefit of the consumer. Professional beauty licensing is an essential component to the health of America’s economy and to the health of its citizens. Beauty professionals touch nearly all Americans across every demographic in large and small communities. These professionals acquire their special skills to provide safe, high quality services to their clients through extensive training, certification and licensing. The professional beauty industry is a critical element in America’s economic landscape and professional beauty licensing is an essential component to the overall health of American consumers and beauty professionals.
Ultimately, licensing of beauty professionals supports an industry of over 2.2 million workers who earn $31.6 billion in wages and contribute $85.8 billion in goods and services to the U.S. economy. The beauty industry is dominated by small businesses, self-employed individuals and exemplifies gender and ethnic diversity. The beauty industry touches almost every American in large and small communities. These trained professionals attend accredited institutions to acquire special skill sets, including hair, nail, skin treatments, business management, sanitation, hygiene, human anatomy, and infection control to provide safe and high quality services for their clients. As with other professional education programs, participants have to pass standardized course exams to demonstrate their knowledge and ability to perform their skills in the marketplace.
With a higher level of training, beauty professionals are able to earn higher wages. Licensing safe and well-trained beauty service providers protect customers from unqualified beauty workers. To ensure consistency from state to state, industry professionals are pushing to harmonize the requirements and  processes to obtain professional beauty licensees to strengthen safety, remove barriers and ensure economic performance of the industry.

The Real Hair Truth

 

Are you doing something about it in your business?

Yes you can go into these super stores of beauty and just about find anything you want inside of them.  Perfumes, cosmetics, makeup, hair care, even hair color. They have a salon to also get you hair styled and whatever else. But to the real professional who has some form of professionalism inside of them. It is merely a flea market like the hair shows.  So how could you work in a company who sell boxed hair color to the consumers coming into the store. And then at the same time work in their salon. I would love to know. That to me is a sign of being in competition with your employer.

But the days of loyalty are gone. That is from a manufacturer and as I might also say from the consumer also. Pity my profession. A lot of the profession has been sliced and diced. You have nail salons to go to, Spa’s to go to. And now Salons who go ahead and offer Blow-Drying and Makeup also. The day of the salon being the place to get your beauty needs done are over. This also increases a lot of competition with in the industry with the professionals. Too many stores create an over saturation of the industry.

Leaving many professionals with out jobs and too much competition.  Nothing wrong with that but from the studio I work at by myself there must be at least 20-30 booth rental and salon advertisements to compete with. Salons now are a dime a dozen. Every strip mall built-in Orlando has a dry cleaner, salon and liquor store in them. Too many salons and too many places to purchase my professional tools, products etc.  But within my industry there are a few factions who bestow the honor of calling themselves “Representatives Of Our Beauty Industry”.  They want you to think they are there for you, but they are merely representatives of the manufacturers.

These organizations who charge over $300.00 to join say they are the “Professional Beauty Association” To represent you on all and every issue governmental to state rulings and passing of laws concerning the Beauty Industry. Believe me everyone they are a scam also. especially when the are buying the hair shows up. I always thought that if you are an oversight committee that you should remain neutral in your preferences within the Beauty Industry. But sit back and investigate for yourself and you will find out they do nothing for you as a professional in the Beauty industry.  Other than giving you a discount to their hair shows.

So many in the industry are keen to my voice and other voices have raised up to take part in informing the professional what it is all about “NOW”. Many new independent company’s are forming and the  Independent social media has taken a HUGE chunk in the education and commentary aspects of the industry. Bravo!  Informing others who and what is really out there now in the industry and who is for the industry etc. A few years ago I seen this gentleman come out of the shadows and live off his daddy’s coat tails. Selling a new product for all in the industry. Claiming,” this will change the industry” my new shampoo and conditioner.. Take it from me when some one speaks of that nature they are merely a “Snake Oil Salesman”. He made a little money but what sold it was is daddy’s last name. This guy didn’t know the difference from a hair pin and a bobby pin. But since he USED his daddy’s name he sold a few bottles and made his money and “WALLAH” he took a boogie out of the industry. Never to be seen again. I can still hear him laughing.

Times change and so do people, this was a very important to me to say a few words. I don’t lose sleep over these action anymore within my industry. I take it for what it is and how it could have been stopped, but never was.  I hold my “CRAFT’ in high regards but when it comes down to the “ELITES” of my industry there words and praises me little to me.  I used to have mentors but that is a big word to me now, which holds a lot of respect but from what I see none can fill those shoes.. Now I just have one mentor and he is the greatest of them all.

Trust me he wont sell me out.

And that’s how I feel.   The Real Hair Truth