Category: Booth Rental Advice

Were Is The Labor Force

Those that are keeping status quo attributed it to continuously slow business and a less-than-thriving economy. Salon owners will not be hiring new staff because they can’t afford to pay a living wage, and paying anything less is not in alignment with their morals. Or really with there GREED. Salon owners and corporate hack shacks will not go far anymore. I believe the beauty industry and the cosmetologists that were out of work during the pandemic. Have been given time to rethink there wage standards. And with different generation look at the industry as a waste of time. Especially if some one comes over the border and can get a job at Walmart at $15.00 a hour.

For those salon owners and corporate salons, actively seeking staff, be it stylists, colorists, assistants or receptionists, the quest is unanimously laborious and mostly unfruitful. “Salon owners are finding it more challenging than ever to find young stylists who are passionate about the beauty industry and who want to work more then two to three days a week.” Corporate salons advertise everywhere. Nobody is even looking at our ads for hiring,because all they offer is commissions. THAT’S IT! Some salon owners use the old trick in the industry of poaching from other salons after failed attempts with traditional advertising methods.

The tried and true method of reaching out directly to beauty schools for new licensed graduates is, for now, a thing of the past—most cosmetology schools were closed during the pandemic, likely due to a combination of stay-at-home orders and a widespread aversion to in-person experiences. The industry is simply behind when it comes to pay, benefits etc.

Some salon owners and corporate hacks find the solution is to hire back former employees rather than continue attempts to attract a new workforce. Others who are seeking help turn to resources such as Indeed, Craigslist, Facebook and Instagram. But either way the salon industry is a industry like China who slaves the work force. No pay, no benefits, no vacation. no medical. NOTHING.

Salons Need Employees/Employees Need Pay

I Have been a Hairdresser/Makeup Artist in the Beauty Industry for 30 years now. And I have never, ever seen a industry that takes advantage of there employee’s before in my whole professional life. The sit and wait policy is still going on in the industry. Which means you will wait for a walk-in client and get no pay what so ever. Not even a salary for someone first starting out in the profession. Owners will ask you to answer the phone, fold towels, sweep the floor, dust the retail shelves and all sorts of free labor they can get out of you. It’s called taking advantage of a human being. Getting what they can for nothing. Is the usual norm in the Beauty Industry. Look at Great Clips they are a tip based company and nothing more. You are required to clean the salon, answer the phone, fight with others for a walk-in customer, dust shelves, do laundry and close the store for only tips. And they will say they give you $9.00 a hour which if you go through your payroll check you are just getting tips. If they gave you $9.00 a hour plus tips you would be getting something to at least pay for your gas and electric bill.

In no other professional industry are you required to work for free. And they are expected to do free labor. Employee’s need to stop this way of abuse. With the Covid Virus running throughout the United States a lot of Beauty Industry Professionals decide to sit and wait it out and receive federal and state unemployment. Which for some was close to $800.00 biweekly. Finally receiving a decent wage for once, they took the time to really look at re-training and moving into a better profession. Having taken the time to see value in there work and taking professional responsibility in there training and advanced training. What more could a employer ask for. In the beauty Industry to a employer it means nothing. How can a person go to work worrying about there rent, insurance, daycare, food, etc. Beauty Industry owners do not care, they have to over head to worry about and will categorize you a a commission employee to stay away from tax’s. But will expect from the employee to do the responsibility’s of a paid employee.

So having a commission employee means nothing to a salon owner, they have to pay no salary, and will not worry about YOU. Even if you have to pay for your mortgage or buy groceries. The salon owner simply collects profit from the hair dresser. Simple scheme. And if you are going to get a salary you will be doing everything and even see your hours cut. And probably let employees go. The times need to change for all.

If you go on Indeed.com you will see a abundance of Beauty Industry jobs posted by Sport Clips, Great Clips, HairCuttery, JCPenneys, Regis Corporation, Hair Masters. They are on a constant basis asking for Stylists, Asst Managers and Managers. WHY? Because they do not pay there employee’s at all. Not even nickels and dimes. Stylist have gotten wise to the profession and come to the conclusion you cannot make a living in it anymore what so ever. Maybe 30 years ago but not anymore. And if you cannot afford to take care of your employees, don’t open a business you will not last long. Restaurant Corporations have become wise now, Hourly wages and higher benefits are abundant, Just look at Target, Walmart, Aldi’s they start there employees at $13.00 hourly now. And if you need a job they are “HIRING” signs all over.

Job’s are plentiful for all now. Wages are better now. But don’t count on making living in the Beauty Industry. The corporations are in control of it all. And they have completely raped it of everything.

No More Professional Licenses

Mississippi no longer requires professional licenses for people who offer low-risk beauty services, a change that will save residents thousands of dollars and hours of time spent on training. House Bill 1312 was signed by Gov. Tate Reeves April 9, and it became law immediately. It removes certification requirements for people who work as eyebrow threaders, eyelash technicians or makeup artists.

The Mississippi State Board of Cosmetology previously required people who receive money for these services to earn an esthetician license. The license requires training and exams, but none of the training deals with applying false eyelashes or eyebrow threading, the technique of using a single strand of cotton thread to remove hair. The legislation was prompted by multiple lawsuits against the board. The first was filed in 2019 on behalf of eyebrow threader Dipa Bhattarai by Mississippi Justice Institute, the legal arm of the Mississippi Center for Public Policy, which advocates for free markets and limited regulation.

Bhattarai, now 26, was forced to close her eyebrow threading business in early 2018 after she received a citation for not having a license. She started her business while studying for an accounting degree at Mississippi University for Women in Columbus, as a way to help pay for school. Bhattarai learned eyebrow threading growing up in her native Nepal, where her aunt owned a salon. Bhattarai said there were few beauty service providers offering eyebrow threading when she opened her business. She started in a mall kiosk and soon expanded to two storefronts, in Starkville and Columbus. She served more than 3,000 customers in two years of business. When she had to close, four employees lost work. Bhattarai, who had just begun graduate school, lost thousands of dollars of business, all the while continuing to pay rent for her stores, which were under lease.

Mississippi Justice Institute director Aaron Rice said these kinds of regulations disproportionately impact the poor, minorities and young people. “A lot of times the people who are trying to get their start in life and get into the market or the workforce are young people who may not have an occupational license,” he said. “That barrier may be more than they can overcome in order to get into a work setting.” In 2020, Madison eyelash technician Amy Burks threatened litigation against the Board of Cosmetology after it threatened to shut down her business of five years because she had no license. Another lawsuit was filed by Fulton makeup artist Karrece Stewart in 2020.

Stewart said she was inspired to push for the law after hearing about Melony Armstrong, a Black woman who fought to get a law passed removing licensure requirements for hair braiding 15 years ago. “She told me what I needed to do to make my dream come true,” said Stewart, who said she spoke with Armstrong when preparing to file her lawsuit. Standing in her salon on Wednesday, Burks said she is grateful to be able to continue her work legally now that the law has changed. “For me personally, it was an integrity issue. It really bothered me to think that I was doing something illegal,” she said. “We have so many clients, and this has just been so overwhelming all the support that we have gotten.”





Gorilla Glue Lady Is A Mess, No Common Sense

Tessica Brown said she had run out of her usual hair spray one day and made the decision to use the Gorilla Glue spray in the interim. As Brown explained, weeks had passed at this point and her hair was still not able to move. “My hair, it don’t move. You hear what I’m telling you? It. Don’t. Move,” she said at the time. “… So I’m tell you like this: If you ever, ever run out of Göt2b Glued Spray, don’t ever use this. Unless you want your hair to be like that forever.”

Over the weekend, Tessica Brown said to her followers on instagram that she was paying a visit to the St. Bernard Parish Hospital in Louisiana. Brown said hospital staff attempted to use nail polish remover and saline water on her head, which caused a burning sensation. “It burned so bad my heart started beating too fast,” she recalled, noting that she ultimately chose to check herself out instead of going through with 20 hours of this attempted remedy. From there, the aim was to continue that treatment from home, though that’s apparently not resulted in progress so far.

She shared an update on Instagram confirming she “will be leaving tomorrow to go see a surgeon.” She thanked those sending her love and shrugged off folks making jokes about her. “I really do love and appreciate everybody I mean everybody that truly has my back.” Hair experts and medical professionals alike have all tried to come together over the last few days to try to find a viable solution for Brown. Some of their suggestions have included using rubbing alcohol and acetone to break down the glue, and Brown even made a trip to the ER. However, nothing so far has been able to help dissolve the adhesive.

Tessica Brown has hired an attorney and is said to be weighing potential legal options in connection with the adhesive spray incident. Per their report, Brown felt that the labeling on the product which is said to have mentioned not using it on eyes, skin, and clothes was misleading. The Gorilla Glue brand released a professional statement via Instagram on Feb. 8, sending their well wishes to Brown. However due to the nature of its product’s use, they were not able to provide any help. “We are very sorry to hear about the unfortunate incident that Miss Brown experienced using our Spray Adhesive on her hair,” the company captioned the post. “We are glad to see in her recent video that Miss Brown has received medical treatment from her local medical facility and wish her the best.”

Days after going viral for the incident, the Beverly Hills plastic surgeon who offered a free procedure (worth an estimated $12,500) to Tessica Brown made good on his promise. “She’s been through a lot and I hope that you guys will learn from Tessica’s injuries or Tessica’s ordeal,” Dr. Obeng said. “Make sure that any time you guys grab something, make sure you read it.” Brown is planning to fly California on Wednesday to start the process, according to the publication. And while the removal is estimated to cost around $12,500, Dr. Obeng is reportedly providing the service pro bono.

Ulta lays off corporate employees

Ulta Beauty laid off employees at its corporate headquarters and among its field management team yesterday as it works to reshape itself amid the ongoing pandemic. Spokeswoman Eileen Ziesemer declined to comment on the number of employees that were laid off but confirmed their last day was Jan. 12.

“While incredibly difficult, these decisions were made thoughtfully with a focus on resetting our corporate cost structure to operate more effectively and efficiently in the short-term as well as optimizing our enterprise capabilities to thrive in the long-term,” Ziesemer said in an email. “The associates leaving Ulta Beauty were of course treated with respect, compassion and support.” The layoffs hit roles across all corporate functions of the Chicago-area-based beauty chain, Ziesemer said.

It also eliminated open roles and reorganized some teams. She said the move expanded certain positions and “introduced a small number” of roles in investment areas. Like many retailers, Ulta has faced struggles during the pandemic. It closed its stores for seven or eight weeks during the shutdowns last spring, closed 19 stores permanently in the third quarter, and has eliminated jobs.

Makeup in particular has been a tricky category during the pandemic. Without excuses to leave the house, many have forgone wearing makeup for months. There are some bright spots, such as above-the-mask eye makeup, and pampering items, such as candles and bath products, executives said on Ulta’s earnings call last month. The shutdowns also drove traffic online. Ulta has 1,262 stores in the U.S., Ziesemer says. The company was founded in 1990. The company most recently reported its employment count before the pandemic. As of last February, Ulta employed about 18,000 full-time and 26,000 part-time workers, according to a filing with the Securities & Exchange Commission from last March. Ziesemer said the total number of corporate associates laid off yesterday was a “meaningful, but relatively small number of our total associates.”