Why You Shouldn’t Be An Entrepreneur

 

 

When a hopeful entrepreneur asks me advice on beginning a startup, my advice is always the same: Don’t do it. It’s awful.

That is not the full truth. The reality is that it’s difficult to start and run a business. It’s a tremendous investment that takes time, effort and capital. Your focus is always on the business. Fantastic highs give way to horrible lows. It causes drastic mood swings (that might seem irrational to others) and extreme financial stress that few really understand. If someone one is going to make it, they won’t listen to my suggestion and will move full-steam ahead.

If this is the path you go down, there are a few things you should expect.

 

Uneven Work/Life Balance

I’ve always struggled with the work/life balance ratios that people often refer to. I genuinely love the challenges that come with creating a business, so I guess you could say I’ve never worked a day in my life. How is that for balance? But in all seriousness, I am almost constantly thinking about work, whether I’m running, reading, with friends or out with my girlfriend. In the back of my head, I’m going over checklists, thinking up new strategies or applications of new technologies. This can make relationships difficult, as you’re always ducking out to take a phone call, canceling dates or are unable to totally focus on on someone. On the flip side, I’m free to make my own schedule, stepping out to take care of personal things or work remotely if I need to.

An Always Moving Finish Line

There are going to be times where it feels like everyone is trying to prevent you from getting to where you want to be. It is easy to get discouraged and swayed. Entrepreneurs must go into what I call “cut-throat mode.” You need to navigate politics, get buy-in and ultimately arrive at your goal. Chances are, until that goal is achieved, you won’t be happy. And even when that happens, a new goal will inevitably appear to embark upon. To compound matters, there may even be multiple goals at the same time. This can ultimately make it challenging to have fun or do social activities with non-entrepreneurs because there is always something more important, in your mind, to do. After all, time is money, and both can be the difference between success and failure.

To tackle this, try breaking your goals into manageable pieces so they are more actionable. Understanding everything that needs to happen and having a plan for how you will accomplish each step eases the burden.

Always Being ‘On’

As an entrepreneur, you always need to be thinking about how your business is perceived by the mainstream. Because of this, you always need to be “on.” You don’t have the luxury of disclosing issues or problems. In order to protect and propel your organization, your guard always needs to be up — prepared to spin negatives or take advantage of opportunities when they appear. For example, responding to questions like “How is the business going?” is incredibly complex. I always stay positive and keep in mind who is asking. You never know who you are going to meet or what they might know. Make sure you are representing yourself and your company well.

Inevitable Stressors

Most humans fail over and over, and this is generally a good thing as long as you learn from it. However, when running a business, there are a lot of dependencies, and ensuring the bottlenecks you are creating are solved can cause a lot of pressure and stress. For example, missing payroll is a very realistic possibility for most startups. Whatever the situation may be, you are the one who is generally responsible for fixing the problem, and chances are you will not always have the answer.

Is It Worth It?

Being an entrepreneur is one of the best and worst things I’ve decided to do. I’ve learned more than I could have imaged and have been faced with challenging situations I never thought I would have to go through, but I’ve also had a ton of fun. If I could choose a different career path, I wouldn’t. It’s not for everyone, but if you are the type of person who, after reading this, still wants to pursue creating your dream company, good for you. Just remember it will most likely be the hardest thing you’ve ever done, but with perseverance, you might just pull it off.

Corporate Slavery Thrives At The Regis Corporation And Hair Masters.

Once again there is not a ending to the corporate slavery I see in my industry. A few weeks ago I applied for a job as Salon Manager, (Corporate Leader as Regis Corporation calls it). At one of there locations called Hair Masters which is located in Metro-west, Florida 32819. I did not go into the job looking for employment since I already have my own studio and basically quite comfortable where I am at. But this interview which was a phone interview I decided to use for the start of my third documentary. Basically outline the corporate greed that is abundant in my industry. The Beauty/Cosmetic Industry.  A phone interview was set up with me and the individual from the company I would say was quite accommodating with my questions. Again I say I used this interview for the documentation of my next Documentary.

After the pleasantry’s The Interviewer gave a job description of the position I was applying for. In the Regis Corporation the job title is SALON LEADER.  Old school terms MANAGER. The job was for a full time position and the details of the job were as follows.

  • Hiring of stylists
  • Education of Stylists. Which for the Regis Corporation is video’s and no funds to send people to school.
  • Ordering of Hair Color, Retail Ordering, Promotions Etc.
  • Weekly Payroll
  • Cleaning of the salon
  • Running the phone operations and scheduling
  • Daily and weekly closeouts
  • Deposits to the bank
  • Training of Employee’s

This seemed like a job or position for someone to move up the ladder and go places with the company.  But may I say the pay is only 50%. And that’s 50% o of what you tell me, no minimum salary with a percentage of services, cheap benefits. And basically they will get FREE labor from anyone stupid enough to take the position.  Company’s have decided to prey on the uneducated of our industry, and promising the sky but with no real modern pay structure. In my industry I have been around the most talented and they know the story. But if you take a person off the streets of Orlando and give them a job at Universal Studios frying shrimp they give the employee a base salary which normally is $400.00 a week, 401k, Free Tickets to the attractions, etc. But a HUGE corporation like Regis cannot even muster up the tidings of giving any of there employee’s a livable wage. Sad how my industry has been degraded, ran through the muck and no one has the BALLS to say anything. I will say I received 50% in 1986 as a stylist, but with the constant strains of Rental increase, Electric, Day Care, Food no one can live off of 50% of nothing. Such a sad state of affairs we are in in this Beauty Industry.

I feel sorry for all the younger professionals who get a bad taste in there mouth when the abundance of Greed and and there lack of Business Knowledge are taken advantage of. And I say True knowledge of how the Beauty Industry is really ran by these corporations and websites. There are no places to go to get help within the industry, unless you hire your own attorney for representation. The are no Organizations to belong to, unless you are in the film industry and you are apart of a Local. This has been going on for a long time.

This is corporate Slavery!

If you are interested in the position here is the information to apply.

 Dina Blades
Senior District Leader
diand2@regisconnect.com   Phone Number: (772) 501-5486