Tag: schools

A $21,000 Cosmetology School Debt, and a $9-an-Hour Job (Part one)

 

When she was in cosmetology school, Tracy Lozano had a love-hate relationship with weekday mornings. Those predawn moments were the only time she saw her infant daughter awake, and she savored them. When the time came to hand the baby to her own mother, she said in a recent interview, she would stifle her tears, letting them roll only when she had closed the door behind her.

She would put on her game face when she pulled into the parking lot of the Iowa School of Beauty, just outside Des Moines. From what Ms. Lozano could tell, a cosmetology license was a realistic way to ensure a better life, and she was willing to make sacrifices. While also working nights at a Pizza Hut, she borrowed $21,000 to cover tuition and salon supplies and put in eight-hour days at the school for the better part of a year.

The amount of time Ms. Lozano spent learning to give haircuts, manicures and facials was enormous, but the requirement was set by the state, and she didn’t much question it. She was determined to earn enough money to move out of her mother’s house. Only a few weeks after getting her cosmetology license in 2005, she was hired at a local Great Clips.  The job, though, paid just $9 an hour, which meant that her days double-shifting at Pizza Hut weren’t over. Even with tips, Ms. Lozano didn’t earn more than $25,000 in any of her first few years as a cosmetologist. For years, she relied on food stamps and health insurance from the state. She couldn’t cover living expenses and keep chipping away at her loan payments. Thirteen years after graduating, she still owes more than $8,000.

What Ms. Lozano didn’t know was that the state-regulated school system she had put her faith in relies on a business model in which the drive for revenue often trumps students’ educational needs. For-profit schools dominate the cosmetology training world and reap money from taxpayers, students and salon customers. They have beaten back attempts to create cheaper alternatives, even while miring their students in debt. In Iowa in particular, the companies charge steep prices — nearly $20,000 on average for a cosmetology certificate, equivalent to the cost of a two-year community-college degree twice over — and they have fought to keep the required number of school hours higher than anywhere else in the country.

Each state sets its own standards. Most require 1,500 hours, and some, like New York and Massachusetts, require only 1,000. Iowa requires 2,100 — that’s a full year’s worth of 40-hour workweeks, plus an extra 20. By comparison, you can become an emergency medical technician in the state after 132 hours at a community college. Put another way: An Iowa cosmetologist who has a heart attack can have her life saved by a medic with one-sixteenth her training.

There’s little evidence that spending more hours in school leads to higher wages. Nor is there proof that extra hours result in improved public safety. But one relationship is clear: The more hours that students are forced to be in school, the more debt they accrue. Among cosmetology programs across the nation, Iowa’s had the fourth-highest median student debt in 2014, according to federal data.

Walk into any hair salon in Iowa and you’re likely to find a stylist making $10 an hour who loves her job but is struggling to pay off her student loans. Over 10 months, in visits to a dozen salons and in conversations with 37 former Iowa cosmetology students — and an additional 25 in other states — we heard a variety of opinions about how much training the profession requires and the financial returns it offers. And we heard again and again how the dream of becoming a professional hairstylist, or someday owning a salon, can be stymied by debt.  The issue is national. More than 177,000 people enroll in for-profit beauty schools across the United States each year, which on average charge more than $17,000 for tuition, fees and supplies to earn a cosmetology certificate.  Across the Iowa border, in Fremont, Neb., Ashley Sandoval makes $10.50 an hour at another Great Clips location. In the five years since she graduated from cosmetology school, she said, interest has ballooned her debt from $22,000 to $29,000. “I’ll be paying it off for the rest of my life,” Ms. Sandoval said.

The Iowa Cosmetology School Association, which acts on behalf of several of the 13 companies that own schools in the state, would not make a representative available for an interview. But the association did provide written responses to questions through its lobbyist, Threase A. Harms. The group said that its primary concern was successfully preparing students, not making money, and that differences in state regulations made comparing hours difficult. The association also doesn’t see the crippling student debt as the schools’ fault, citing the fact that students are allowed to take out more in loans than is necessary to cover educational expenses. “We have students graduating with minimal debt because they made wise choices,” the association said.

Cosmetology schools have a unique business model in the for-profit school world. They have two main streams of revenue. The first comes from students, often in the form of taxpayer-funded grants and loans to pay for the tuition. Cosmetology schools took in nearly $1.2 billion in federal grants and loans during the 2015-16 school year.  The second stream is the salon work the students do while in school. They spend some time in classrooms learning about, for example, chemicals and how to sanitize the work space, but once they’ve hit a certain number of hours, they start working on real clients in salons run by the schools. In full-time programs, going to school becomes a full-time job, where students clock in and out for seven- or eight-hour shifts.

The total number of required hours varies, but all states require some amount of practice with paying customers. In Iowa, students spend 715 hours in the classroom and 1,385 hours on the floor.

Prices for these salon services — which include haircuts, manicures, facials and, at some schools, massages — are typically set below market rates to attract customers. The salons also sell shampoo, conditioner and other beauty products. One Iowa student said he and others had gotten perks (such as trips and special training) if they sold enough products. Another student, who sued a school in Pennsylvania, reported that her grades were partly based on whether she offered salon products to clients.  The schools don’t have to pay students for the services they provide; in fact, the students pay tuition for the hours they work in the salons.

All told, for-profit cosmetology schools nationwide brought in more than $200 million in revenue from their salons in the 2015-16 school year, according to federal statistics. Most schools are small, privately owned entities that do not have to disclose their profits.  “Without the revenue coming from those salons, most of these schools wouldn’t be profitable, or it would be marginal,” said Leon Greenberg, a lawyer in Las Vegas who has examined the financial documents of several schools he unsuccessfully sued under the Fair Labor Standards Act. “It’s pretty much ingrained in their business model.”  Some schools have pushed their business models to the legal limit — and beyond, according to government regulators.

La’ James International College owns six of the 27 cosmetology schools in Iowa, plus one in Nebraska and another in Illinois. Iowa’s attorney general sued the school in 2014, accusing it of defrauding students through deceptive marketing and enrollment practices. Under a settlement, the school admitted no wrongdoing but agreed to forgive almost $2.2 million in student debt. It had to pay a $500,000 fine, and the owners — Cynthia Becher and her son, Travis Becher — had to personally pay fines of $25,000 each. The federal government also placed La’ James under restrictive monitoring for alleged mishandling of students’ financial aid. (The Bechers declined to comment on the suit.)

Lisa Shaw, a former La’ James massage instructor, said Ms. Becher had met with staff members regularly and often told them, “This is a business first, and a school second.”

Ms. Shaw and Bez Lancial-McMullen, a former La’ James cosmetology instructor at the campus in Davenport, Iowa, recalled attending meetings in which company officials spoke of the need to maintain sizable profits. Students were regularly pulled out of Ms. Lancial-McMullen’s classes to work in the salon, she said. Other complaints submitted to the attorney general’s office about the school describe similar practices, although the Bechers have consistently denied the claims.  Both women eventually resigned because they objected to the way students were being treated. Ms. Shaw left in 2014, saying the company’s owners looked at students “as dollar signs.”  “I feel like the school is predatory,” Ms. Shaw said. “I could no longer be a part of taking people’s money and then treating them like that.”  Stephanie Wood Becher, who is the school’s director of marketing (and Travis Becher’s wife), denied that Cynthia Becher would ever tell employees to put the school’s business needs first.  “Education and betterment of the student is always and has always been the #1 priority for her and L.J.I.C.,” Ms. Wood Becher wrote in an email.

La’ James had to open its books during the attorney general’s lawsuit, revealing annual profits that ranged from $1.2 million to $3.4 million from 2009 through 2012. In Iowa, tuition, fees and supplies for its cosmetology program come to $21,500 per student.  Compared with other institutions, “I think we’re cheap,” Mr. Becher said, noting that the cost includes books and supply kits. “We’re private. We’re not public. We don’t get tax breaks.”  The Becher family also owns more than a dozen limited liability companies, which include a distribution center for its salon products. In 2017, the United States Department of Education reprimanded La’ James for failing to publicly disclose a rape in a dorm in Nebraska. Federal law requires colleges to publish annual security reports and logs about crimes on campus, which La’ James failed to do, “exposing students and staff to potential harm,” according to government reviewers.Joni Buresh, the school’s compliance officer, said in an email that the security reports were available to students, and that she believed that the law requiring crime logs didn’t apply to campuses like the one in Nebraska.    She acknowledged that a rape had been reported to the police but said that school officials “honestly are not confident that this rape incident ever occurred.” Ms. Buresh said they had now filed the paperwork requested by the federal reviewers.

END OF PART ONE.

You Should know FDA Authority Over Beauty/Cosmetics

 
Sorry everyone I’m not selling hair care, or teaching haircuts, or color but what I can give you is information that you should know. I have been in the Beauty/Cosmetic industry for well over 25 years and take it from me, a product is here yesterday and gone tomorrow. In Cosmetology school there is a lack of education being given to the student on laws of products, what a manufacturer can say and not say ie (labeling, ingredient’s). What governmental agency’s are there for the protection of the independent stylist and also for the salon employee. Many, many individuals will set up blogs, websites telling you how to overcome customer relations, how to hair color, how to haircutting, and often these individuals will set up a class telling you how to make a ‘Facebook page”. I see this alot at the beauty shows in my industry. But I never really see the hard facts being given to the professional. Its easy to skirt the issues of the beauty industry, “Keep the dumb”, I say. Which to me is so very sad. Many of my fellow professionals are given a line of BS, and are insulted by manufacturers and so-called beauty icons and magazine and websites. Not really taking the issues that are needed for change in my industry, Product knowledge is what they will get and only enough education to buy a product the manufacturers are pushing. Below is important information you should know about the FDA, and how it will help you within your profession. Never, never take the sales persons,distributors or manufactures word as law in the beauty/cosmetic industry, investigate on your own and come to your on conclusions. And if you see a so-called beauty industry “ICON’ pushing a product, WATCHOUT, they are basically being paid to SELL that product!
What does the law say about cosmetic safety and labeling?
The two most important laws pertaining to cosmetics marketed in the United States are the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act1 (FD&C Act) and the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act2 (FPLA). The Food, Drug & Cosmetic Act prohibits the marketing of adulterated or misbranded cosmetics in interstate commerce. Violations of the Act involving product composition–whether they result from ingredients, contaminants, processing, packaging, or shipping and handling–cause cosmetics to be adulterated and subject to regulatory action.
 
Under the FD&C Act, a cosmetic is adulterated if–
“it bears or contains any poisonous or deleterious substance which may render it injurious to users under the conditions of use prescribed in the labeling thereof, or under conditions of use as are customary and usual” [with an exception made for hair dyes];
“it consists in whole or in part of any filthy putrid, or decomposed substance”;
“it has been prepared, packed, or held under insanitary conditions whereby it may have become contaminated with filth, or whereby it may have been rendered injurious to health”;
“its container is composed, in whole or in part, of any poisonous or deleterious substance which may render the contents injurious to health”; or except for hair dyes, “it is, or it bears or contains, a color additive4 which is unsafe within the meaning of section 721(a)” of the FD&C Act. (FD&C Act, sec. 601).
 
Improperly labeled or deceptively packaged products are considered misbranded and subject to regulatory action. Under the FD&C Act, a cosmetic is considered misbranded if–
“its labeling is false or misleading in any particular”;
“its label does not include all required information;
“the required information is not adequately prominent and conspicuous;
“its container is so made, formed, or filled as to be misleading”;
“it is a color additive, other than a hair dye, that does not conform to applicable regulations issued under section 721 of the FD&C Act; and
“its packaging or labeling is in violation of an applicable regulation issued pursuant to section 3 or 4 of the Poison Prevention Packaging Act of 1970.” (FD&C Act, sec. 602)
In addition, under the authority of the FPLA, FDA requires an ingredient declaration to enable consumers to make informed purchasing decisions. Cosmetics that fail to comply with the FPLA are considered misbranded under the FD&C Act. It is important to understand that Congress passes the laws that govern the United States. To put those laws into effect, Congress authorizes certain government agencies, including FDA, to create and enforce regulations, but only as authorized under the law. A change in FDA’s statutory authority over cosmetics would require Congress to change the law.
Does FDA approve cosmetics before they go on the market?
FDA’s legal authority over cosmetics is different from other products regulated by the agency, such as drugs, biologic, and medical devices. Cosmetic products and ingredients are not subject to FDA premarket approval authority, with the exception of color additives. However, FDA may pursue enforcement action against violative products, or against firms or individuals who violate the law.
Must cosmetic manufacturers register with FDA?
Manufacturers are not required to register their cosmetic establishments, file data on ingredients, or report cosmetic-related injuries to FDA. However, companies are encouraged to register their establishments and file Cosmetic Product Ingredient Statements with FDA’s Voluntary Cosmetic Registration Program11 (VCRP).
Can FDA inspect cosmetic manufacturers?
FDA can and does inspect cosmetic manufacturing facilities10 to assure cosmetic product safety and determine whether cosmetics are adulterated or misbranded under the FD&C Act or FPLA.
What actions can FDA take against firms that market adulterated or misbranded cosmetics?
FDA may take regulatory action if it has information to support that a cosmetic is adulterated or misbranded. The agency can pursue action through the Department of Justice in the federal court system to remove adulterated and misbranded cosmetics from the market. To prevent further shipment of an adulterated or misbranded product, the agency may request a federal district court to issue a restraining order against the manufacturer or distributor of the violative cosmetic. Violative cosmetics may be subject to seizure. FDA also may initiate criminal action against a person violating the law. In addition, FDA works closely with the U.S. Customs and Border Protection8 to monitor imports. Under section 801(a) of the FD&C Act, imported cosmetics9 are subject to review by FDA at the time of entry through U.S. Customs. Products that do not comply with FDA laws and regulations are subject to refusal of admission into the United States. Violative products must be brought into compliance (if feasible), destroyed, or re-exported. FDA takes regulatory action based upon agency priorities, consistent with public health concerns and available resources.
 
Can FDA order the recall of a hazardous cosmetic from the market?
Recalls of cosmetics are voluntary actions taken by manufacturers or distributors to remove from the marketplace products that represent a hazard or gross deception, or that are somehow defective. FDA categorizes a firms action as a recall (as opposed to a market withdrawal) when it determines that the product hazard or defect represents a violation of the FD&C Act. FDA is not authorized to require recalls of cosmetics but does monitor companies that conduct a product recall and may request a product recall if the firm is not willing to remove dangerous products from the market without FDA’s written request. Recalls are addressed in Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), sections 7.40 through 7.59.
Who is responsible for substantiating the safety of cosmetics?
Cosmetic firms are responsible for substantiating the safety of their products and ingredients before marketing. Failure to adequately substantiate the safety of a cosmetic product or its ingredients prior to marketing causes the product to be misbranded unless the following warning statement appears conspicuously on the principal display panel of the product’s label:
“Warning–The safety of this product has not been determined.” (21 CFR 740.10)
In addition, regulations prohibit or restrict the use of several ingredients5 in cosmetic products and require warning statements6 on the labels of certain types of cosmetics. In general, except for color additives and those ingredients which are prohibited or restricted from use in cosmetics by regulation, a manufacturer may use any ingredient in the formulation of a cosmetic provided that the ingredient and the finished cosmetic are safe, the product is properly , and the use of the ingredients does not otherwise cause the cosmetic to be adulterated or  under the laws that FDA enforces.
 
Joseph Kellner Hairdresser/Mua/Film Producer

Shop Around When Going To Hairdressing School

If there is one element of the human appearance that most stands out, it’s the hair. Just think about how often you’ve heard someone describe a person by their hair color or style – it’s a common occurrence. Many people find that they have a knack for styling hair. Maybe they’ve experimented by cutting a friend’s or their child’s, and now want to turn it into a career. While part of hairdressing is talent, it takes proper hair design training to really become a proper hair stylist. I feel that schools should have a mandatory of 2500 hours in a nationwide curriculum course. State’s require to little time to be spent in school. And off they go! Take an exam and you have a license.

By attending a Cosmetology course you’ll learn the finer points of styling hair. This includes learning the current and ongoing popular trends, as well as the timeless elements of form that go into every good style. Students of hair design will also learn about proper health and maintenance of hair, which is vital to maintaining a good style. Some schools will also encourage their students to embrace their creativity and try to develop their own styles that will really wow their future clients. Schools often teach out of manuals that are not current, and the course’s should be current. When taking the exam there should be a written test but also a practical. I also feel that the License should not be given until the student completes an apprenticeship of a mandatory of one year. Then I feel the license should be given to the student.

Hair design courses vary wildly in terms of cost and how difficult they are to get admitted to. For a long time, people viewed hairdressing schools as the places that people went when they couldn’t cut it in a real college. However, it is increasingly become a more legitimate choice to enroll in cosmetology programs and learn hair design and other beauty enhancing skills. Along with that shift, many new hair design training schools have arisen. Some of these schools are highly exclusive and very expensive. Watch out for all the Private Colleges, Career Training Institutes, Vocational Schools also.

However, there are still many government sponsored programs that are designed to be inexpensive, quick and rudimentary introductions to the world of hairdressing. These programs provide students without training and knowledge to pass a certification test in their state, but little else. Those who dream of hairdressers who are known across the world – or at least in their local communities – are more likely to get the training they need at a private hair design school. Costs for the more exclusive schools can rival the costs of prominent four-year universities, while the prices for the smaller programs can be much cheaper than even community colleges.

For many people, hair design is a form of art. It be discouraging to an up-and-coming hair stylist when they discover that the hair design school they want to attend is out of the price range. Fortunately, there are many options available to help students pay their way through hair design courses. Government grants.
For a good Cosmetology Course I highly recommend TONI&GUY, VIDAL SASSOONS! EXCELLENT SCHOOLS!
Joseph Kellner

The Apprenticeship Of Hairdressing

Students embarking on a career in hairdressing are often quite anxious to skip the prelims and jump into the inventive part of the course. In this exceptional career, not placing the emphasis on the fundamental principles can only lead to catastrophe. Making major mistakes when it comes to hair does not allow for easy camouflage. The basic principles including learning texture, shape and balance. These are the fundamentals of any great hairstyle and then it leads to a little more creativity in the pattern creation. Proportions are elements that the upcoming hairstylist must be come adept at as well. They must be able to use their sense of opinion. Often the pupil is oblivious that there are basic techniques that must be mastered when it comes to the tools of the trade. These are blow dryers, curling irons, and straighteners just to name a few. A student in hairdressing must learn to adapt solid study habits, patience and endurance. As we mentioned there isn’t much of a allowance for mistakes when it comes to the hair. They must also learn to be observant and prepared to stay attuned to the world of fashion. In many cases, they complement each other.

Three Apprenticeships I went through and all were a life experience. These three gentlemen had a different knack to what they did, and hopefully the students who come out of the hairdressing schools will please appreciate the value of learning under a Master. Though there are not any Degrees in my profession that will give you the level of Master. When you apply for the stewardship you will be able to tell immediately if it is a good fit for you!

Joseph Kellner

The Real Hair Truth Facebook.com

THE REAL HAIR TRUTH.

There comes a time when enough is enough especially for my industry. I have been in this lovely profession for twenty-three years plus! I am tired of the manufacturer’s depleting the industry, distributorships being bought up by manufacturer’s. Salon owners not treating their employee’s as employee’s. Salons not holding up to the standards of education. And also hairdresser’s not SPEAKING UP!. When the time comes you will be quite surprised at the non participation of the professionals, and then it will be too late. Change must come and the change must come from you also. I can make all the Films I possibly want to but not having the participation of the industry for added support the gain will be futile. Crazy as it may sound the industry is taking away from the professional. And the “CIRCLE MUST BE BROKE”. Website’s that started as informational are now online stores.

Hard times are upon us and I also feel the constraints of this era, no longer will it be affordable for you to open up a salon and progress as a small business owner. Distributorship will increase their costs, you will also have to. Schools will just manufacture students, and some industry schools tuitions are as high as $19.000 dollars. Now hairdressing is not rocket science it is an art, $19,000 is way to much. And these large manufacturers are spitting out these schools at a rate of 2-3 a month and also worldwide!.

The laws of Cosmetology renewals are a laugh a booklet for nothing, 30-40 questions of imbecilic knowledge will not keep our cosmetologists on a path of higher education.  It only defeats the purpose and insults the professional. This is done on a state-wide level to meet a very short detailed requirement of generalship. THATS ALL!!

It is up to the license professional to take matters in there own hands and lift their industry out of the nickel and dime era we are in. To stop the political enviroment plaguing our hair show, and professional organizations. Is any professional cosmetology organizations doing anything for you, I went on a well known site and the links did’nt even work.  I don’t see anything. Is the online industry website’s providing you with information that is New! That is a big NADA, only trying to sell you crap, crap. And emailing you constantly will holiday bargains, or promoting there “CIRCLE” It is all to comforting for them to stay in this, since they are getting your money. And to show off anything NEW would be a financial, and risky endeavor for them. So don’t expect anything to change with them. They play it safe. But enclose themselves in a hollow shell. SAD! But let me give them a word of advice. Its all about ART,  and CONTENT!

Is the price of your salon supplys decreasing and is the distributorships offering you anything other than product knowledge class’s. I use Goldwell hair color and since last May I have not even received a brochure from the distributorship (EVOLUTION SALON SUPPLYS – JACKONSVILLE, FLORIDA).  Not one form of educational venue  is offered in a structured  form from my distributor. I have not seen my sales consultant in over 6 months. And when I do its to sell me something, a bargain package of goods. Or to let me know someone from the “CIRCLE” has just started there own retail line.

Look I have been there and I know what it is to be a salon Employee, Salon owner, Booth renter. I know how hard it is to scrimp and save, to train someone and see them go out the door, to rent a booth and see the salon owner abuse my space and also work around alcoholics, drug users, etc/ I HAVE BEEN THERE. But I cannot change or try to implement change without the help of the community. It is not hard to speak up for yourself and defend you craft. I love my work and my profession, I have had many, many ups and downs. Highs and lows and I must accept then with a grain of salt. But if you are bothered by what is happening in our community of hairdressing then you must WAKE UP! And speak you mind. Let people know your beliefs, and also take the responsiblity of your professional success. Nothing will come to you easily. You will learn to embrace the quality of hard times and the successions of perseverance. That is how you will succeed. But you will not change the industry with your own success singularly. It must be done as a whole and as a simple step towards the cleansing of the profession that it  needs. To stand-alone will gain you defeat but to instil a facet of unity and togetherness then the ball will roll.

AND ROLL IT WILL !!!!

Joseph Kellner

Beauty school at center of state investigation!

A state investigation is looking into allegations against the Portland Beauty School, which is accused of allowing students to buy credit hours and cheat on state and federal tests.

State officials said they started their investigation when they received a tip from a credible source who said the fraudulent activity took place at the beauty school between March and August. Some of the school’s students may have graduated illegally, according to Oregon health licensing agents.

Mytien Huynh Kent, who owns the school on Northeast Siskiyou Street, said never expected to be the target of such an investigation.

“We really feel that this is a false accusation,” Huynh Kent said. “All of this is a shock and we have no idea where this is coming from.”

On Tuesday morning, Huynh Kent said, Oregon health licensing agents and Portland police raided the school with a search warrant, removing all of her financial, student and personnel documents.

The beauty school is also accused of selling answers to state and federal accreditation tests.

Veteran hair stylist Ambrosia Carey said earning your license legitimately isn’t simply for the client’s beauty, but also for their health and safety.

“(You need to) be able to recognize diseases and disorders,” Carey said. “Otherwise, you could end up cross-contaminating and spreading disease to other people.”

No licenses have been revoked from the Portland Beauty School so far.

If the investigation reveals fraud, however, criminal charges could be filed.

Huynh Kent insists all of her students follow the state’s standards and laws. She can’t imagine her instructors allowing them to cheat.

“Most of our staff has been with us, some for over than 10 years,” she said.

The beauty school will remain open throughout the investigation. Huynh Kent said any instructor who is found to have helped students cheat will be fired immediately. She said she takes pride in the school because she has invested her life into the family business.

“Building our own school was our dream so this is something we have put our heart into,” Huynh Kent said. “It’s not just a job that we go to. This is our home.”

Mytien Huynh Kent and her entire family are nothing but crooks. I knew her and her family when they were running scams in Seattle. Her parents owed tens of thousands of dollars in taxes to the St. of WA, so they fled to Oregon to set-up shop. She has bragged about getting over on the gov’t for over a decade. It’s good to see the law finally caught up with her and her entire family. Mytien is finally getting what she deserves! The Portland Beauty School is a complete SCAM!!

HAIRDRESSING SCHOOLS MAKING HEADWAY DURING THE RECESSION!

IFLOOKSCOULDTHRILL.COM

Have you ever been to a student beauty salon? If not, you should definitely consider it, especially if you’re looking to save a few bucks during the recession. Student salons have become increasingly popular during this time and you’re definitely in good hands, despite what you may think.

In fact, student salons have experienced supervisors on hand to watch over and answer any questions students may have. And though it may take a bit of extra time, it’s totally worth it. You wouldn’t want someone rushing through a beauty service you’re paying for no matter how skilled they are.

Another advantage of a student salon is the great specials they have throughout different times of the year. For different services that suit you best, you may find great deals from students who really care about what they are doing. And you’ll be helping them out by giving them the opportunity to have more experience.