Tag: salon

High-End Salon Business Is Nearing Its End?

 

Traditional salon business is struggling. Sprawling salons with fancy addresses owned by celebrity stylists are on their way to extinction if they don’t evolve. Gone are the days where the salon was the one-stop shop for all beauty needs. Better, faster, more affordable options have taken significant market share, leaving high-end salons struggling to compete and cover their overhead.

The slow death of the high-end salon:

  1. Deal Chasing – Services like Gilt, Groupon, and LifeBooker gave smaller salons offering steep discounts a competitive edge, taking business from higher-end salons.
  2. DIY – YouTube and Instagram how-to content replaced the advice and guidance of high-end stylists.
  3. Beauty Bars – Hyper-focused boutiques specializing in facials, brows, waxing, blowouts, and lashes for a fraction of the cost.
  4. On Demand – Where you want it, when you want it services appeal to the Uber generation.
  5. Salon Culture – Approximately 60 percent of hairstylists are freelance, and salons have a reputation for being mismanaged and run poorly. On the other side of the equation, startups like Dry bar and Glam squad continually invest in stylist education and technology.

Racked summarizes it best, “If Dry bar is known for easy, flawless blowouts and Glam-squad is reliable for fast, at-home services, what do the hundreds of local salons have left to offer customers?” One thing is certain: the traditional salon model needs to evolve or high-end salons will become extinct.

Beauty Industry Entrepreneurs, who supports them?

Beautiful Lies

You know what is amazing in my industry you can tell the “sheepple” the truth about their industry but they are still sheep. There are a lot of followers in my industry but the people I highlight in my film are true entrepreneurs. They are trying to make a difference within their profession. The manufacturers, so-called organizations, industry websites and magazines go ahead and advertise the (Icons) of the  beauty industry. Don’t get me wrong I love my craft, but the people they advertise as “Icons” are the ones who are doing the brain washing for the financial pyramid, within my industry. I always tell my friends or they ask me, Why do you make these films? There is no money in it!. Or I love this one, You will never make a name for yourself in this industry. I am not looking to be in an beauty industry magazine or website, etc. I follow my own path. God said to us all, “Follow the path less traveled”. And it is true, you have to be your own man or person in this world. And the main moral or value to this is, “Do what you feel is right”.  I have never been a follower in my life, I have my own business (Salon), and I enjoy writing and making Documentary’s.

I am not the best, but I learn from my prior mistakes and enjoy critics.

In my industry the major manufacturers sell to the commercial sector which is basically the consumer.. There was a time when all good hair care products, hair color, hair color treatments were done in the salon and sold only in the salon. This gave our profession more value more respect. But with the birth of the internet. Beauty manufacturers gave notice and realized that they could also sell their products and hair color to the world with little or no expense. Just build a web page and purchase a domain that has nothing to do with the parent company and sell and give next day delivery to the consumer. Little did they know how bad of a hurting they have done to my beauty industry.  Now in the year 2013 you can buy hair color, treatments and such on the internet. And these are the same products that are used in hair salons all over the United States. Yes even the hair color can be bought on the internet and delivered next day to the consumer. Even the keratin treatments can be bought on the internet. So as time went by little did they know (Major Manufacturers) were putting a hurting on my industry. The economy in the U.S is horrible now and clients will say to you I am living up north for a few months can I get my formula. And the hairdresser will give it to them, only to find out they never see them again. They now have the formula and can do it at home. So many professionals will give the manufacturer their loyalty, and there undivided devotion and purchase hair color, etc. from them.  But at the same time knowing the manufacturers make a hair color for the commercial sector to buy.  L’Oreal, Clairol, you name it. So where is the exclusive from the manufacturer to the salon owner or professional? Why would a salon professional buy from a manufacturer and basically they are competing for business with the manufacturer!

Where is the Manufacturer Loyalty?

There is none. And the sad thing about it is the so-called professionals will back up these manufacturers. They don’t realize that putting up a sign on the salon window from L’Oreal, Paul Mitchell, Clairol, that are giving the company free advertising. And they will carry these lines even though they are sold in the mass market. You are in competition with the manufacturer wake up everyone!

Some industry professionals make their own product lines, books, films, makeup etc. These entrepreneurs feel why not put the money in their own pockets instead of supporting the financial pyramid in the cosmetic industry. But it is hard for them to start-up. In an industry dominated by major manufacturers. The manufacturers can buy the movie stars,  do mass marketing etc. Which takes money, money, money. The entrepreneur will either formulate or private label the product line and then finish it. And hopefully will have the finances placed aside for marketing. A lot of entrepreneurs will do it in there local. Which will save on shipping for them.  Business is Business, I accept that. But in my beauty industry, magazines, websites, hair shows will go to the major manufacturers and have them buy advertising space, booth space at their hair shows at monumental prices. The magazines, websites, hair shows do that and charge them. Knowing they can pay that kind of money. The entrepreneur cannot do that.  And those funds sustain the beauty magazines, websites, hair shows. If they did not charge those fee’s they would not have their websites or magazine. Major manufacturers will also pay the magazines, and websites hair color or products’ in place of cash for their payment. The beauty industry magazine’s and websites will go ahead and sell those products’ online to get their money back for the advertising bought by the manufacturer. Believe in what I say soap in this industry is GOLD. An entrepreneur cannot do that so basically who is giving the small guy in the industry a bone? They learn to network together. They follow like-minded people and they blossom. Believe me not to the extent of the “Big Boys”. Because the major manufacturers will keep an eye on them!

Should we not be advertising the new in my professional or keep up feeding the Major Manufacturers who place chemical that are harmful in out products. They are kings of deceptive marketing. And they know how to stretch the law. No worry’s for them. If they get fined by OSHA, or the FDA. It will not even be penny’s to them.  So where does the little guy come in? They cannot afford the fee’s for advertising in an industry magazine on a consistent basis, hair show fee’s are huge, and industry websites only back the big boys on the beauty/ cosmetic industry. Rolling out a spread in an industry magazine for a few months can be the total amount of finances an entrepreneur has for the year. The entrepreneur is done after that. Time to hit the pavement and go door to door.

It’s all a big money pit for everyone except for the little guy (Entrepreneur) in the beauty industry.  They have to tooth and claw for what little they have in my industry.  God forbid you piss off the Big Boys they will stop financing the magazines and hair shows. Then what will we have, I can tell you a true beauty industry. Forget about it. It’s a money pyramid, not even the beauty industry’s so-called organizations could even have the slightest clue. If you look at the PBA most of the board are from manufacturers.  There too busy buying up hair shows and asking for financial help from the Big Boys so they can sustain themselves. They should teach in beauty school how to be your own man. The  entrepreneurs are scattering for the meager pieces of cheese that drop down from the top. And the sad thing about this is the industry professionals are the sheeple in an industry that rapes them each and everyday! They are mere salesmen and women for the Big Boys.

Ask yourself, “Who really is the ASSHOLE, the Manufacturer, Website or Industry magazine.  Who advertise these Big Boys who are sticking it up your ASS each and everyday.

Or is it the Asshole who makes the films to let you know who really is concerned about you.

So tell me who is really the asshole here.?

God forbid we stand up for the right things in our profession.

Best Regards Joseph Kellner

GIB LLC, aka Brazilian Blowout Slapped on the hands by the Feds!

 

Here is the settlement!!!!!  Of course in my beauty industry you wont see this in a trade magazine, or posted by the any so-called industry website! Because it’s all about money. Advertising dollars are what sustain beauty industry publications, and independently owned websites. Behindthechair.com is owned by Loreal, and Hairbrained.me is an independently owned website. Advertising dollars are what sustain these entity’s. Modern Salon is owned by Vance Publishing Corp, and it goes on and on. Why would they write anything negative or truthful about the industry when they can potentially get the money from a manufacturer to have them buy future advertisement in their magazines or websites. It’s not about protecting you as a professional or informing you in a neutral way. It’s all about the coporate dollar, Not your health! The professional beauty industry preys on the non-educated, just like the cosmetic industry preys on the non-educated consumer.

The settlement requires GIB, LLC, which does business under the name Brazilian Blowout, to cease deceptive advertising that describes two of its popular products as formaldehyde-free and safe. The company must also make significant changes to its website and pay $600,000 in fees, penalties and costs.

“California laws protect consumers and workers and give them fair notice about the health risks associated with the products they use,” said Attorney General Harris. “This settlement requires the company to disclose any hazard so that Californians can make more informed decisions.”

Today’s settlement is the first government enforceable action in the United States to address the exposures to formaldehyde gas associated with Brazilian Blowout products. It is also the first law enforcement action under California’s Safe Cosmetics Act, a right-to-know law enacted in 2005.

In November 2010, the Attorney General’s office filed suit against GIB, LLC for violating five state laws, including deceptive advertising and failure to provide consumers with warnings about the presence of a carcinogen in its products.

The settlement covers two products used in a popular salon hair straightening process, the “Brazilian Blowout Acai Smoothing Solution” and the “Brazilian Blowout Professional Smoothing Solution”.

The complaint alleged the two products contained formaldehyde but were labeled “formaldehyde free.”
Proposition 65 requires businesses to notify Californians about certain exposures to chemicals in the products they purchase. Formaldehyde is on the Proposition 65 list of chemicals known to cause cancer.

The complaint alleged that that GIB – the manufacturer of the Brazilian Blowout products – did not inform customers or workers that formaldehyde gas was being released during a Brazilian Blowout treatment, and therefore product users did not take steps to reduce their exposure, such as increasing ventilation. Under the terms of the settlement, GIB is required to:

– Produce a complete and accurate safety information sheet on the two products that includes a Proposition 65 cancer warning; distribute this information to recent product purchasers who may still have product on hand; and distribute it with all future product shipments. The revised safety information sheet — known as a “Material Safety Data Sheet,” or MSDS — will be posted on the company’s web site.

– Affix “CAUTION” stickers to the bottles of the two products to inform stylists of the emission of formaldehyde gas and the need for precautionary measures, including adequate ventilation.

– Cease deceptive advertising of the products as formaldehyde-free and safe; engage in substantial corrective advertising, including honest communications to sales staff regarding product risks; and change numerous aspects of Brazilian Blowout’s web site content.

– Retest the two products for total smog-forming chemicals (volatile organic compounds) at two Department of Justice-approved laboratories, and work with DOJ and the Air Resources Board to ensure that those products comply with state air quality regulations.

– Report the presence of formaldehyde in its products to the Safe Cosmetics Program at the Department of Public Health.

– Disclose refund policies to consumers before the products are purchased.

– Require proof of professional licensing before selling “salon use only” products to stylists.

GIB will also pay $300,000 in Proposition 65 civil penalties, and $300,000 to reimburse the Attorney General’s office fees and costs.

Real Hair Truth Advice on the Cosmetic Industry

The Real Hair Truth

In my next Documentary “Beautiful LieS”, I have interviewed so many Beauty salon employees, booth renters etc to make sure they know there products they use are legitimate. So many company’s will use deceptive labeling/marketing on their products. And if you do not take the time to investigate what are the ingredients in the products you are responsible for any issues that may arise during a service to your client. Yes once you buy a product from a manufacturer and a distributor you own that product. If something happens during the application and process of the product “YOU BOUGHT IT, NOW YOU OWN IT”. You cannot sue the manufacturer, they are not liable legally to any problems due to application and processing of the product! Especially if you are an independent contractor, make sure you have at least 2-3 millions dollars in insurance to cover yourself in the salon.  Watch your back my friends. I had a sale person come to my studio las week. He was selling a Keratin Product called, Bionaza little did he know I new alot about the company. I have cameras in my salon so I went ahead and switch them on. I asked the gentleman some questions about the product, and of course he promised the stars to me. And the product will split the oceans and the heavens and make my clients hair ever so dreamy. He also told me he was selling the product from a friend and this Bionaza was not from his distributor. He didn’t even have any directions on the product. And when I confronted him on how easy it is to buy the so-called “SALON PRODUCT” on the internet he quickly turned heels. Watch out for “SNAKE OIL SALESMEN”, my friends! Especially the lone wolf types, they will sell you anything, but will hastily throw you under the bus if the product does not do what it says it will do. This should be a good filmed clip for my Documentary.

SCUM OF THE BEAUTY INDUSTRY! Be Aware My Friends

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration today announced four new OSHA Training Institute (OTI) Education Centers and the renewal of 24 existing OTI Education Centers. Current OTI Education Centers offer training courses on OSHA standards and occupational safety and health issues. The new OTI Education Centers, which are non-profit organizations, will provide additional outlets for safety and health training to workers and employers throughout the country.

“This year, we have seen record numbers of requests for occupational safety and health training from the private sector and federal agency personnel,” said Dr. David Michaels, assistant secretary of labor for occupational safety and health. “The renewal of OTI’s Education Centers and the addition of four new centers will help OSHA to meet this demand and deliver life-saving training to our country’s employers and workers.”

The OTI Education Centers program was created in 1992 to complement the OSHA Training Institute in Arlington Heights, Ill., which provides training and education to OSHA compliance officers. The OTI Education Centers provide training nationwide to private sector and federal personnel from agencies outside OSHA. The OTI Education Centers trained more than 40,000 people during the 2012 fiscal year, representing an all-time record for the program.

The OTI Education Centers also assist the agency in administering the OSHA Outreach Training Program and fulfilling the program’s monitoring requirements. OTI Education Centers are the principal distribution channel for Outreach Training Program trainer courses, including prerequisite and update courses. Trainer courses are offered by topic areas including construction, general industry, disaster site and maritime. Through these train-the-trainer programs, qualified individuals who complete a one-week OSHA trainer course are authorized to teach 10-hour or 30-hour courses focusing on safety and health hazards. Through the Outreach Training Program, more than two million people received training from fiscal 2010 through fiscal 2012. This is a voluntary program and does not meet training requirements for any OSHA standards.

The new OTI Education Centers were selected through a national competition announced on April 13, 2012, and published in the Federal register on April 15. Applicant organizations were evaluated based on organizational experience, staff experience, location and training facilities, marketing and recruitment, administrative capabilities, evaluation, and the ability to provide training throughout a given region. OSHA provides no funding to the OTI Education Centers. The OTI Education Centers support their OSHA training through their established tuition and fee structures and provide their own instructors and facilities. For more information on the OTI Education Centers Program, the Outreach Training Program, and the Directorate of Training and Education.

For information on the geographic areas served by OSHA’s Regional Offices, visit http://www.osha.gov/html/RAmap.html.

IMPORTANT NOTE! Make sure that when you are working in your salon that the owner or company adheres to the policy’s standards OSHA has mandated for your safety.

Your health is very important!

You may file a complaint to have OSHA inspect their workplace if they believe that your employer is not following OSHA standards or that there are serious hazards. Employees can file a complaint with OSHA by calling 1-800-321-OSHA (6742) or by printing the complaint form and mailing or faxing to your local OSHA area office. Complaints that are signed by an employee are more likely to result in an inspection.

You Should know FDA Authority Over Beauty/Cosmetics

 
Sorry everyone I’m not selling hair care, or teaching haircuts, or color but what I can give you is information that you should know. I have been in the Beauty/Cosmetic industry for well over 25 years and take it from me, a product is here yesterday and gone tomorrow. In Cosmetology school there is a lack of education being given to the student on laws of products, what a manufacturer can say and not say ie (labeling, ingredient’s). What governmental agency’s are there for the protection of the independent stylist and also for the salon employee. Many, many individuals will set up blogs, websites telling you how to overcome customer relations, how to hair color, how to haircutting, and often these individuals will set up a class telling you how to make a ‘Facebook page”. I see this alot at the beauty shows in my industry. But I never really see the hard facts being given to the professional. Its easy to skirt the issues of the beauty industry, “Keep the dumb”, I say. Which to me is so very sad. Many of my fellow professionals are given a line of BS, and are insulted by manufacturers and so-called beauty icons and magazine and websites. Not really taking the issues that are needed for change in my industry, Product knowledge is what they will get and only enough education to buy a product the manufacturers are pushing. Below is important information you should know about the FDA, and how it will help you within your profession. Never, never take the sales persons,distributors or manufactures word as law in the beauty/cosmetic industry, investigate on your own and come to your on conclusions. And if you see a so-called beauty industry “ICON’ pushing a product, WATCHOUT, they are basically being paid to SELL that product!
What does the law say about cosmetic safety and labeling?
The two most important laws pertaining to cosmetics marketed in the United States are the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act1 (FD&C Act) and the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act2 (FPLA). The Food, Drug & Cosmetic Act prohibits the marketing of adulterated or misbranded cosmetics in interstate commerce. Violations of the Act involving product composition–whether they result from ingredients, contaminants, processing, packaging, or shipping and handling–cause cosmetics to be adulterated and subject to regulatory action.
 
Under the FD&C Act, a cosmetic is adulterated if–
“it bears or contains any poisonous or deleterious substance which may render it injurious to users under the conditions of use prescribed in the labeling thereof, or under conditions of use as are customary and usual” [with an exception made for hair dyes];
“it consists in whole or in part of any filthy putrid, or decomposed substance”;
“it has been prepared, packed, or held under insanitary conditions whereby it may have become contaminated with filth, or whereby it may have been rendered injurious to health”;
“its container is composed, in whole or in part, of any poisonous or deleterious substance which may render the contents injurious to health”; or except for hair dyes, “it is, or it bears or contains, a color additive4 which is unsafe within the meaning of section 721(a)” of the FD&C Act. (FD&C Act, sec. 601).
 
Improperly labeled or deceptively packaged products are considered misbranded and subject to regulatory action. Under the FD&C Act, a cosmetic is considered misbranded if–
“its labeling is false or misleading in any particular”;
“its label does not include all required information;
“the required information is not adequately prominent and conspicuous;
“its container is so made, formed, or filled as to be misleading”;
“it is a color additive, other than a hair dye, that does not conform to applicable regulations issued under section 721 of the FD&C Act; and
“its packaging or labeling is in violation of an applicable regulation issued pursuant to section 3 or 4 of the Poison Prevention Packaging Act of 1970.” (FD&C Act, sec. 602)
In addition, under the authority of the FPLA, FDA requires an ingredient declaration to enable consumers to make informed purchasing decisions. Cosmetics that fail to comply with the FPLA are considered misbranded under the FD&C Act. It is important to understand that Congress passes the laws that govern the United States. To put those laws into effect, Congress authorizes certain government agencies, including FDA, to create and enforce regulations, but only as authorized under the law. A change in FDA’s statutory authority over cosmetics would require Congress to change the law.
Does FDA approve cosmetics before they go on the market?
FDA’s legal authority over cosmetics is different from other products regulated by the agency, such as drugs, biologic, and medical devices. Cosmetic products and ingredients are not subject to FDA premarket approval authority, with the exception of color additives. However, FDA may pursue enforcement action against violative products, or against firms or individuals who violate the law.
Must cosmetic manufacturers register with FDA?
Manufacturers are not required to register their cosmetic establishments, file data on ingredients, or report cosmetic-related injuries to FDA. However, companies are encouraged to register their establishments and file Cosmetic Product Ingredient Statements with FDA’s Voluntary Cosmetic Registration Program11 (VCRP).
Can FDA inspect cosmetic manufacturers?
FDA can and does inspect cosmetic manufacturing facilities10 to assure cosmetic product safety and determine whether cosmetics are adulterated or misbranded under the FD&C Act or FPLA.
What actions can FDA take against firms that market adulterated or misbranded cosmetics?
FDA may take regulatory action if it has information to support that a cosmetic is adulterated or misbranded. The agency can pursue action through the Department of Justice in the federal court system to remove adulterated and misbranded cosmetics from the market. To prevent further shipment of an adulterated or misbranded product, the agency may request a federal district court to issue a restraining order against the manufacturer or distributor of the violative cosmetic. Violative cosmetics may be subject to seizure. FDA also may initiate criminal action against a person violating the law. In addition, FDA works closely with the U.S. Customs and Border Protection8 to monitor imports. Under section 801(a) of the FD&C Act, imported cosmetics9 are subject to review by FDA at the time of entry through U.S. Customs. Products that do not comply with FDA laws and regulations are subject to refusal of admission into the United States. Violative products must be brought into compliance (if feasible), destroyed, or re-exported. FDA takes regulatory action based upon agency priorities, consistent with public health concerns and available resources.
 
Can FDA order the recall of a hazardous cosmetic from the market?
Recalls of cosmetics are voluntary actions taken by manufacturers or distributors to remove from the marketplace products that represent a hazard or gross deception, or that are somehow defective. FDA categorizes a firms action as a recall (as opposed to a market withdrawal) when it determines that the product hazard or defect represents a violation of the FD&C Act. FDA is not authorized to require recalls of cosmetics but does monitor companies that conduct a product recall and may request a product recall if the firm is not willing to remove dangerous products from the market without FDA’s written request. Recalls are addressed in Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), sections 7.40 through 7.59.
Who is responsible for substantiating the safety of cosmetics?
Cosmetic firms are responsible for substantiating the safety of their products and ingredients before marketing. Failure to adequately substantiate the safety of a cosmetic product or its ingredients prior to marketing causes the product to be misbranded unless the following warning statement appears conspicuously on the principal display panel of the product’s label:
“Warning–The safety of this product has not been determined.” (21 CFR 740.10)
In addition, regulations prohibit or restrict the use of several ingredients5 in cosmetic products and require warning statements6 on the labels of certain types of cosmetics. In general, except for color additives and those ingredients which are prohibited or restricted from use in cosmetics by regulation, a manufacturer may use any ingredient in the formulation of a cosmetic provided that the ingredient and the finished cosmetic are safe, the product is properly , and the use of the ingredients does not otherwise cause the cosmetic to be adulterated or  under the laws that FDA enforces.
 
Joseph Kellner Hairdresser/Mua/Film Producer