Professional Salon Products- Ingredient Disclosure Victory!

On September 14th, California Governor Jerry Brown signed into law the Professional Salon Products Labeling Act (AB 2775). Previously, ingredient labels were not required on professional salon products, leaving workers and consumers in the dark about harmful ingredients. Thanks to AB 2775, companies that sell professional nail, hair, and beauty salon products in California are now required to list ingredients on product labels. As companies move to comply with this new labeling law, the impact will be felt across the country. About time everyone!

 

Frédéric Fekkai Buys Back His Brand

Frédéric Fekkai, in partnership with Cornell Capital LLC, has taken back the brand he started by acquiring Frédéric Fekkai Brands.

Fekkai Brands creates hair and body care products, including shampoos, conditioners, treatments, hair fragrances and styling products. Additionally, the company owns and operates a number of salons across the US.

Fekkai, who founded his namesake brand in 1996, sold it in 2008 to Procter & Gamble. P&G then sold the brand in 2015 to a joint venture formed between the CEOs of Designer Parfums and Luxe Brands.  The ownership group selling off the company includes Dilesh Mehta, Tony Bajaj, Joel Ronkin and Amy Sachs

Blue Mistral LLC, a holding company founded by Fekkai and Cornell Capital, will own and operate Fekkai Brands together with Bastide, a fast-growing Provence-based provider of luxury fragrances and hand and body care products that Fekkai has led since 2017. As CEO of Blue Mistral, Fekkai will further accelerate the growth of the Fekkai Brands and salons by placing a heightened emphasis on education, innovation and the customer’s overall experience while leveraging opportunities for collaboration with Bastide.

“I am thrilled to rejoin Fekkai Brands and eager to reconnect with the salons, teams and consumers,” said Fekkai. “This acquisition will provide me the opportunity to reinfuse my passion for innovation into the brand, while reigniting its growth and guiding Fekkai Brands through its next chapter in a modern and exciting way.”

“The opportunity to partner with Frédéric, a proven entrepreneur in the beauty sector, as he returns to the helm of his iconic brand is truly compelling,” said Henry Cornell, senior partner of Cornell Capital. “Leveraging Cornell Capital’s cross-border network and operational expertise, and Frédéric’s deep relationships and reputation within the industry, Fekkai Brands is well-positioned to succeed in the growing global cosmetics and personal care industry.”

Ronkin, exiting CEO of Fekkai Brands added, “Frédéric is an accomplished entrepreneur with a proven track record of building highly desirable brands. We are confident that his return to the Company will be instrumental in fueling its growth and driving innovation.”

Salon Product Ingredient Disclosure Bill Is Now Law In California

 

Salon workers, who are overwhelmingly women, are exposed to a broad array of very toxic chemicals in the nail, hair, and beauty products they work with every day. They usually don’t have access to information about the toxicity of these products because professional beauty product ingredients aren’t required by law to be labeled.

The California Professional Cosmetics Labeling Requirements Act (AB 2775) co-sponsored by BCPP requires an ingredients list on professional cosmetic product labels. This bill gives nail, hair and beauty salon workers vital information about the chemicals they are exposed to day in and day out.  On May 30, 2018 AB 2775 passed the CA State Assembly with unanimous bi-partisan support (76 to 0).  On August 24, 2018 the bill passed the CA State Senate again with overwhelming bi-partisan support.  California Governor Jerry Brown signed AB 2775 into law September 14, 2018.

Nail and hair salon workers, who are overwhelmingly women, are exposed to dangerous chemicals in hair dyes, straighteners and relaxers, make-up and nail products. In California, this means nearly a half million licensed nail and hair salon workers are exposed to chemicals like formaldehyde, toluene, phosphates, and other chemicals linked to cancer, reproductive harm, respiratory, and neurological harm every day.  Several studies have found elevated rates of breast cancer among hairdressers and cosmetologists. In fact, the International Agency for Research on Cancer lists “occupational exposures as a hairdresser or barber” as a probable carcinogen[1]. Studies show hair dressers experience an increased risk of miscarriage, giving birth to low birth weight babies, neurological conditions such as Alzheimer’s. Nail salon workers suffer negative impacts to maternal and fetal health as well as respiratory harm.  Currently, manufacturers must list ingredients on the labels of cosmetics sold at the retail level—this is good for the people who sell, buy, and use those products. However, the ingredients in professional cosmetics do not have to be listed on product labels. This lack of transparency makes it impossible for beauty professionals to make informed choices about the products they use and how to protect their health.

 

California Assembly Bill 2775 (CA AB 2775) gives salon workers the information they need to protect their health.  While federal regulation requires the labeling of ingredients in beauty and personal care products marketed to consumers and sold in retail settings, there is no equivalent disclosure requirement for products used in professional salon settings including nail, hair and beauty salons. This lack of transparency prevents salon professionals from getting the information they need to protect themselves and their clients from unsafe chemical exposures.  Introduced by Assemblymember Ash Kalra, AB 2775 requires manufacturers of professional cosmetic products sold in California to provide a full list of ingredients on products starting July 1, 2020, excluding fragrance and colorants.  BCPP co-sponsored California Assembly Bill 2775, introduced by Assemblymember Ash Kalra, along with Black Women for Wellness, the California Healthy Nail Salon Collaborative, and Women’s Voices for the Earth.  The bill has broad based support from nearly 3 dozen leading NGOs including American Cancer Society Action Network, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, NRDC, Clean Water Action, and Consumer Federation of California. AB 2775 also has the support of various industry trade associations and a leading multinational cosmetics company including the Personal Care Products Council, the Professional Beauty Association, California Chamber of Commerce, and Unilever.

How Can You Make A Living?

Today I went on an Interview for the “Hell of It”, to a new business in the Orlando area.  I am currently employed and have my own business. But from time to time I go out and see what the industry is offering in the industry employment wise that is.  Today I went to a new business it is a “Blow Dry Bar”. And my appointment was at 11:30 so I arrived 20 minutes early and the manager took me and started the interview with me. She was very nice and informative, the decor of the salon was beautiful red and grey colors. When I was told to take a seat the salon chair was ready to fall apart. This is where services and clients are seated on. Not a good sign for me, right off the bat.

My interview started off with the familiar questions, “How long have you been in the industry, What are you looking for, Blah Blah. I was informed the salon is open for only one month and there are 12 employee’s in the salon. There are three shifts and the salon opens at 7:00am to closing which is at 9:00pm. The salon offers blow-dry’s, makeup, and keratin treatments. The manager told me we are a “Finishing salon”. No other services are offered. So if you are hired you are expected to clean, clean and fold towels. There is no wages only a cut of you $39.00 blow dry. Which was only $15.00 dollars. HOW DO YOU PAY YOUR BILLS? How? While is was being interviewed there was only one client in the salon. I asked the manager “If there are twelve employee’s in the salon they all need to be built up, client wise. So how can I offer you my loyalty if I am being used to clean, promote and do makeup without any formal wages. So If I go to work and I do nothing, I get nothing. CRAZY.” And then on the flip side of it all. How does a salon employer expect to keep professionals. And of course keep motivated driven people. Theirs no way at it. Its like a candle lite on both ends, sooner or later the business is gone. Crazy.

I went to see their makeup counter and there was hardly anything to work with. And cleanliness was something to be wanted in the salon. They teach you for 3 days how they want the hair styled and there are no other ways to do except their way. So there are only six looks you can leave with. That’s it. No makeup training at all. And a very somber atmosphere in the salon. So if you want to go in debt try this place out. So many professionals in my industry are not paid a minimum wage for their time, the salon owners want free labor.  They want to have a love overhead. At the expense of the employee’s. Which is so sad. And so many people come and go in the industry. I have seen so many talented professional leave and get discouraged. In a constant worry of how they can even get gasoline money and food. Basic housing is another story. How can you concentrate on your work if you have no way of paying your basic needs. The industry is famous for it.

A college graduate will get a job and receive a wage, if you walk into Burger King you get a wage, WalMart will give you a wage. Also sick day pay and vacation pay. When will this start in my industry.  But in my industry there is still the old Gothic way of paying you. Commission that’s it. This has to be changed.

This can no longer be. This is FREE LABOR.

 

High-End Salon Business Is Nearing Its End?

 

Traditional salon business is struggling. Sprawling salons with fancy addresses owned by celebrity stylists are on their way to extinction if they don’t evolve. Gone are the days where the salon was the one-stop shop for all beauty needs. Better, faster, more affordable options have taken significant market share, leaving high-end salons struggling to compete and cover their overhead.

The slow death of the high-end salon:

  1. Deal Chasing – Services like Gilt, Groupon, and LifeBooker gave smaller salons offering steep discounts a competitive edge, taking business from higher-end salons.
  2. DIY – YouTube and Instagram how-to content replaced the advice and guidance of high-end stylists.
  3. Beauty Bars – Hyper-focused boutiques specializing in facials, brows, waxing, blowouts, and lashes for a fraction of the cost.
  4. On Demand – Where you want it, when you want it services appeal to the Uber generation.
  5. Salon Culture – Approximately 60 percent of hairstylists are freelance, and salons have a reputation for being mismanaged and run poorly. On the other side of the equation, startups like Dry bar and Glam squad continually invest in stylist education and technology.

Racked summarizes it best, “If Dry bar is known for easy, flawless blowouts and Glam-squad is reliable for fast, at-home services, what do the hundreds of local salons have left to offer customers?” One thing is certain: the traditional salon model needs to evolve or high-end salons will become extinct.

Beauty Industry Entrepreneurs, who supports them?

Beautiful Lies

You know what is amazing in my industry you can tell the “sheepple” the truth about their industry but they are still sheep. There are a lot of followers in my industry but the people I highlight in my film are true entrepreneurs. They are trying to make a difference within their profession. The manufacturers, so-called organizations, industry websites and magazines go ahead and advertise the (Icons) of the  beauty industry. Don’t get me wrong I love my craft, but the people they advertise as “Icons” are the ones who are doing the brain washing for the financial pyramid, within my industry. I always tell my friends or they ask me, Why do you make these films? There is no money in it!. Or I love this one, You will never make a name for yourself in this industry. I am not looking to be in an beauty industry magazine or website, etc. I follow my own path. God said to us all, “Follow the path less traveled”. And it is true, you have to be your own man or person in this world. And the main moral or value to this is, “Do what you feel is right”.  I have never been a follower in my life, I have my own business (Salon), and I enjoy writing and making Documentary’s.

I am not the best, but I learn from my prior mistakes and enjoy critics.

In my industry the major manufacturers sell to the commercial sector which is basically the consumer.. There was a time when all good hair care products, hair color, hair color treatments were done in the salon and sold only in the salon. This gave our profession more value more respect. But with the birth of the internet. Beauty manufacturers gave notice and realized that they could also sell their products and hair color to the world with little or no expense. Just build a web page and purchase a domain that has nothing to do with the parent company and sell and give next day delivery to the consumer. Little did they know how bad of a hurting they have done to my beauty industry.  Now in the year 2013 you can buy hair color, treatments and such on the internet. And these are the same products that are used in hair salons all over the United States. Yes even the hair color can be bought on the internet and delivered next day to the consumer. Even the keratin treatments can be bought on the internet. So as time went by little did they know (Major Manufacturers) were putting a hurting on my industry. The economy in the U.S is horrible now and clients will say to you I am living up north for a few months can I get my formula. And the hairdresser will give it to them, only to find out they never see them again. They now have the formula and can do it at home. So many professionals will give the manufacturer their loyalty, and there undivided devotion and purchase hair color, etc. from them.  But at the same time knowing the manufacturers make a hair color for the commercial sector to buy.  L’Oreal, Clairol, you name it. So where is the exclusive from the manufacturer to the salon owner or professional? Why would a salon professional buy from a manufacturer and basically they are competing for business with the manufacturer!

Where is the Manufacturer Loyalty?

There is none. And the sad thing about it is the so-called professionals will back up these manufacturers. They don’t realize that putting up a sign on the salon window from L’Oreal, Paul Mitchell, Clairol, that are giving the company free advertising. And they will carry these lines even though they are sold in the mass market. You are in competition with the manufacturer wake up everyone!

Some industry professionals make their own product lines, books, films, makeup etc. These entrepreneurs feel why not put the money in their own pockets instead of supporting the financial pyramid in the cosmetic industry. But it is hard for them to start-up. In an industry dominated by major manufacturers. The manufacturers can buy the movie stars,  do mass marketing etc. Which takes money, money, money. The entrepreneur will either formulate or private label the product line and then finish it. And hopefully will have the finances placed aside for marketing. A lot of entrepreneurs will do it in there local. Which will save on shipping for them.  Business is Business, I accept that. But in my beauty industry, magazines, websites, hair shows will go to the major manufacturers and have them buy advertising space, booth space at their hair shows at monumental prices. The magazines, websites, hair shows do that and charge them. Knowing they can pay that kind of money. The entrepreneur cannot do that.  And those funds sustain the beauty magazines, websites, hair shows. If they did not charge those fee’s they would not have their websites or magazine. Major manufacturers will also pay the magazines, and websites hair color or products’ in place of cash for their payment. The beauty industry magazine’s and websites will go ahead and sell those products’ online to get their money back for the advertising bought by the manufacturer. Believe in what I say soap in this industry is GOLD. An entrepreneur cannot do that so basically who is giving the small guy in the industry a bone? They learn to network together. They follow like-minded people and they blossom. Believe me not to the extent of the “Big Boys”. Because the major manufacturers will keep an eye on them!

Should we not be advertising the new in my professional or keep up feeding the Major Manufacturers who place chemical that are harmful in out products. They are kings of deceptive marketing. And they know how to stretch the law. No worry’s for them. If they get fined by OSHA, or the FDA. It will not even be penny’s to them.  So where does the little guy come in? They cannot afford the fee’s for advertising in an industry magazine on a consistent basis, hair show fee’s are huge, and industry websites only back the big boys on the beauty/ cosmetic industry. Rolling out a spread in an industry magazine for a few months can be the total amount of finances an entrepreneur has for the year. The entrepreneur is done after that. Time to hit the pavement and go door to door.

It’s all a big money pit for everyone except for the little guy (Entrepreneur) in the beauty industry.  They have to tooth and claw for what little they have in my industry.  God forbid you piss off the Big Boys they will stop financing the magazines and hair shows. Then what will we have, I can tell you a true beauty industry. Forget about it. It’s a money pyramid, not even the beauty industry’s so-called organizations could even have the slightest clue. If you look at the PBA most of the board are from manufacturers.  There too busy buying up hair shows and asking for financial help from the Big Boys so they can sustain themselves. They should teach in beauty school how to be your own man. The  entrepreneurs are scattering for the meager pieces of cheese that drop down from the top. And the sad thing about this is the industry professionals are the sheeple in an industry that rapes them each and everyday! They are mere salesmen and women for the Big Boys.

Ask yourself, “Who really is the ASSHOLE, the Manufacturer, Website or Industry magazine.  Who advertise these Big Boys who are sticking it up your ASS each and everyday.

Or is it the Asshole who makes the films to let you know who really is concerned about you.

So tell me who is really the asshole here.?

God forbid we stand up for the right things in our profession.

Best Regards Joseph Kellner

GIB LLC, aka Brazilian Blowout Slapped on the hands by the Feds!

 

Here is the settlement!!!!!  Of course in my beauty industry you wont see this in a trade magazine, or posted by the any so-called industry website! Because it’s all about money. Advertising dollars are what sustain beauty industry publications, and independently owned websites. Behindthechair.com is owned by Loreal, and Hairbrained.me is an independently owned website. Advertising dollars are what sustain these entity’s. Modern Salon is owned by Vance Publishing Corp, and it goes on and on. Why would they write anything negative or truthful about the industry when they can potentially get the money from a manufacturer to have them buy future advertisement in their magazines or websites. It’s not about protecting you as a professional or informing you in a neutral way. It’s all about the coporate dollar, Not your health! The professional beauty industry preys on the non-educated, just like the cosmetic industry preys on the non-educated consumer.

The settlement requires GIB, LLC, which does business under the name Brazilian Blowout, to cease deceptive advertising that describes two of its popular products as formaldehyde-free and safe. The company must also make significant changes to its website and pay $600,000 in fees, penalties and costs.

“California laws protect consumers and workers and give them fair notice about the health risks associated with the products they use,” said Attorney General Harris. “This settlement requires the company to disclose any hazard so that Californians can make more informed decisions.”

Today’s settlement is the first government enforceable action in the United States to address the exposures to formaldehyde gas associated with Brazilian Blowout products. It is also the first law enforcement action under California’s Safe Cosmetics Act, a right-to-know law enacted in 2005.

In November 2010, the Attorney General’s office filed suit against GIB, LLC for violating five state laws, including deceptive advertising and failure to provide consumers with warnings about the presence of a carcinogen in its products.

The settlement covers two products used in a popular salon hair straightening process, the “Brazilian Blowout Acai Smoothing Solution” and the “Brazilian Blowout Professional Smoothing Solution”.

The complaint alleged the two products contained formaldehyde but were labeled “formaldehyde free.”
Proposition 65 requires businesses to notify Californians about certain exposures to chemicals in the products they purchase. Formaldehyde is on the Proposition 65 list of chemicals known to cause cancer.

The complaint alleged that that GIB – the manufacturer of the Brazilian Blowout products – did not inform customers or workers that formaldehyde gas was being released during a Brazilian Blowout treatment, and therefore product users did not take steps to reduce their exposure, such as increasing ventilation. Under the terms of the settlement, GIB is required to:

– Produce a complete and accurate safety information sheet on the two products that includes a Proposition 65 cancer warning; distribute this information to recent product purchasers who may still have product on hand; and distribute it with all future product shipments. The revised safety information sheet — known as a “Material Safety Data Sheet,” or MSDS — will be posted on the company’s web site.

– Affix “CAUTION” stickers to the bottles of the two products to inform stylists of the emission of formaldehyde gas and the need for precautionary measures, including adequate ventilation.

– Cease deceptive advertising of the products as formaldehyde-free and safe; engage in substantial corrective advertising, including honest communications to sales staff regarding product risks; and change numerous aspects of Brazilian Blowout’s web site content.

– Retest the two products for total smog-forming chemicals (volatile organic compounds) at two Department of Justice-approved laboratories, and work with DOJ and the Air Resources Board to ensure that those products comply with state air quality regulations.

– Report the presence of formaldehyde in its products to the Safe Cosmetics Program at the Department of Public Health.

– Disclose refund policies to consumers before the products are purchased.

– Require proof of professional licensing before selling “salon use only” products to stylists.

GIB will also pay $300,000 in Proposition 65 civil penalties, and $300,000 to reimburse the Attorney General’s office fees and costs.