Tag: STYLISTS

Missouri Great Clips Stylists Worked While Infected With Coronavirus!

Great Clips salons in Springfield, Missouri, have temporarily closed because of “repeated threats” that came after two stylists worked while infected with the corona-virus, potentially exposing more than a hundred customers, the company and police said.

Great Clips Inc. said in a statement that salons in the Springfield area were closed because of threats it received Wednesday, but it did not disclose the nature of the threats. On Saturday, the Springfield-Greene County Health Department announced that a second stylist at a single location tested positive and that 140 customers had potentially been exposed.

“To protect the safety of everyone, the local franchisees made the decision to temporarily close salons in the Springfield area. They are working closely with law enforcement officials as the officials conduct a thorough investigation of these threats,” Great Clips Inc. said in a statement.

So far, the second stylist is the only person who has tested positive in connection with the case. The health department said Thursday that 42 clients have since tested negative.  An email to a Springfield police spokesperson about the nature of the threats was not immediately returned Thursday night.

But Springfield police spokeswoman Jasmine Bailey told The Associated Press that the first threat came from a Facebook message to an employee on Saturday. The second threat was phoned to a salon Wednesday.  Bailey said that in both cases, the messages “were threatening to shut the place down” because the stylists potentially exposed people to the virus.

The first stylist’s positive result was announced by health officials Friday, and they said the stylist worked for eight days while experiencing symptoms.  The positive test for the second stylist, at the same location, was announced by the health department Saturday.  Both stylists and the customers were wearing masks, the health department has said.

Missouri hair salons and barbershops have been allowed to reopen after they and other nonessential businesses were ordered closed under a statewide stay-at-home order to slow the spread of the corona-virus. It was not clear when the Springfield area Great Clips salons may reopen.

So Far The Beauty Industry in 2015 at a Glance

real hair truth

Comprised of a diverse yet interrelated set of business lines, the beauty industry helps us look and smell our best. Before we leave the house each day, we have likely undergone our personalized beautification ritual. Included in this ritual is the daily shower and shave, the weekly nail trim, and the monthly haircut. And increasingly we are taking a more holistic view of our health, and our beautification ritual may now include a periodic massage and trip to the spa. But our concern with our appearance is hardly anything new; indeed the beauty industry has been expanding and growing for all of recorded history. For the interested entrepreneur this continuing growth and evolution offers a diverse menu of opportunity.

The beauty industry today encompasses far more than cosmetics and skin care products, though they are still a significant portion of the sector. A wide range of services and products are available to help us put our best face forward, and the beauty industry now also encompasses hair styling and hair removal, nail and tanning salons,massage parlors, shower and shaving products, perfumes, colognes and more. Many people now treat their beauty ritual as an escape from the hustle of the information age, whether its a few minutes spoiling oneself with a high-end product or a full day at a luxury spa.

Lotions, Treatments and Baths. Oh my!

Beauty industry opportunities can be broadly separated between products and services, though many providers offer both. Within both products and services, however, exist a wide range of business models based on target market, production processes and location.

From exfoliating soaps and volumizing shampoos to anti-wrinkle creams, the beauty industry provides us with choices galore to keep us looking younger and healthier. Cosmetics exist for every style and taste, as well as every skin tone, texture and even allergy. Rows of toothpaste stretch off into the distance at the local retail outlet, and it is no longer a choice only of brand, but between whitening, tartar protection, flavor, packaging styles and more! And a similar story is told in the aisles for perfume, deodorant and hair coloring. Certain businesses also distinguish themselves through manufacturing processes such as using all natural ingredients or a refusal to use animal testing on products.

While the diversity among service providers is not quite as extensive, there is considerable differentiation between offerings based on price, location and target markets. Some businesses target the inexpensive, fast hair cut market while others focus on providing a luxury spa experience. Franchise opportunities exist for hair salons, skin treatments, nail care, and tanning. Niche providers offer products and services focused on children, weddings,  and fashion, among others.

Different Beauty Franchise Opportunities

  • Hair Care
    • Stylists
    • Salons
    • Shampoos/Conditioners
    • Coloring Product
    • Styling Product (Gels, Sprays, etc.)
  • Cosmetics & Skin Care
    • Make-Up
    • Moisturizing Lotions
    • Tanning Salons
    • Sun Care Products
  • Fragrance

    • Perfumes
    • Body Sprays
    • Cologne
    • Deodorants
  •  Miscellaneous
    • Nail Polish
    • Shaving Products
    • Massage Parlors
    • Hair Removal Service

Beauty Industry Trends

Such diversity and innovation exists because we demand it. The beauty industry continues to expand globally, with some projections claiming 8.5% growth by 2014; revenue growth in 2010 is estimated at 3.3%. Several trends support this expansion and promise continued profitability into the future.Globally, rising per capita incomes and greater access to international markets are increasing spending on discretionary items such as perfumes and cosmetics. Though the recent economic turmoil had decreased spending on some discretionary products in the United States, purchasing of beauty products has remained strong. Consumers did tend to be more price-conscious however, with over 70% of survey respondents claiming to give mass market products more consideration over high-end products during the downturn.

Perhaps not as surprising as it once was, one of the fastest growing segments of the beauty industry is products and services aimed at men. Traditionally focused on female consumers, men today are gaining increasing attention from the beauty industry. Of course most of us have been using deodorant and toothpaste for several months already, but increasingly men are being targeted for body sprays, specialty hair products, lotions and even nail care. Salons offer a menu of pampering services for men, including cuts and shaves, facials, massages and manicures.

Consumers of beauty industry products tend to be brand loyal, and share what works for them with their friends. 58% of those surveyed claimed that personal recommendations weigh more heavily than celebrity marketing, and only 44% bought a particular product for its claim of specific product attributes. Like many things, beauty products gain a level of familiarity and comfort for the consumer, and switching to a new product often takes some extra incentive. Popular and successful marketing campaigns in the beauty industry often include a free sample and discounts for referrals to lure new customers in, and loyalty programs to keep them.

Beauty Industry Franchise Opportunities

From product innovation, organic industry growth and continued growth into the male half of the population, the beauty industry continues to offer a diverse set of profitable franchising opportunities. Beauty franchises exist across the space with dozens of strategies reaching all types of consumer.

Retail opportunities include brick-and-mortar store locations as well as home-based businesses, and span across cosmetics, skin care, hair care, tanning and more. Frequently producers of beauty industry products will have a franchising distribution system, or even have training locations for service providers. Cosmetic and skin care entrepreneurs offer specialized services such as nail care and tanning, a complete menu designed for the full day experience and everything in between. Some salons offer an exclusive membership experience and others specialize on walk-in business.

Hair care opportunities exist for barbers and stylists alike, with a range of different franchises available based on cost, location, and gender. Many male-focused franchises offering everything from the basic barbershop to “the ultimate relaxed grooming experience” have been springing up to complement the traditionally female-focused salon offerings. Franchise chains devoted to children offer a more entertaining environment for kids. There are also businesses focused on hair removal and coloring. Eco-friendly salons such as the Splish franchise offer hair care in an environmentally conscious environment.

As we can see, the beauty industry encompasses a wide range of products and services, and franchising plays a major part in bringing them to the consumer. As the industry continues to grow and evolve, profitable opportunities will abound…the hard part is choosing which one!

2013 In Review For the Real Hair Truth Organization/Jotovi Designs Inc

TheRealHairTruthLogo (1)mediumsize

The blog (The Real Hair Truth)/organization (Jotovi Designs) did well this past year.  The “TRUTHFUL”  voice for the industry will always be here on this page. The truth of the industry will always be written and told by me. Even though you will not find it in Modern Salon, PBA, Salon Galaxy,  Hairbrained.me, ETC.  And my films will voice the truth of the industry, ‘The Real Hair Truth, The Beautiful Lies”. Thank you everyone for your support the last 7 years. We have did it on our own without the help of industry magazines, websites, or cosmetic brands.

Jotovi Designs Inc.

We have funded our books and films on our own and will continue to do so.  Jotovi Designs Inc. is not looking for any help financially from any beauty/cosmetic industry brands and will continue to do so!  The organization continues to help professionals in the industry and will continue to do so! This year will be the release of the second documentary called “Beautiful Lies”.  I thank everyone for their continued support and may all have a wonderful New Year!

Best Regards

Joseph Kellner

Here’s an excerpt:

The concert hall at the Sydney Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 19,000 times in 2013. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 7 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

L’Oréal Hair Product Class Action Lawsuit Settlement. Burn In Hell!!

TheRealHairTruthLogo

As usual in our industry, See no Evil, Hear no Evil, Speak no Evil. None of the So-called industry websites, comic books, or fan clubs will do no reporting against no major manufacturer in my industry. It is common knowledge for manufacturers to supply the latest and greatest to the industry sheep. For the purpose of increasing the financial pyramid for themselves. No longer is there a honest approach of informing the beauty industry of news about class action lawsuits for the betterment of the industry. WHY YOU SAY? Because industry giants sustain the beauty industry and give financial backing to the comic books, websites and fan clubs. If one of the three prior mentioned “bite” the hand that feeds them there would be no existence for that website, or magazine or organization.  So in general you will not know who, what, where in this industry. You will be led unless you do any investigative work by yourselves.

REALHAIRTRUTH

L’Oréal USA Inc. has reached a class action lawsuit settlement over claims it falsely marketed shampoo, condition and styling products under the Matrix, Kérastase, Redken and Pureology brand names.Under the proposed settlement agreement, L’Oréal will modify the labels of these products to remove certain misleading language.

The L’Oréal settlement will resolve a class action lawsuit (Richardson v. L’Oréal USA Inc.) that alleges L’Oréal misled consumers into believing they could only purchase the Matrix, Kérastase, Redken and Pureology products exclusively in professional salons, when consumers can purchase the products in major retail outlets.

REAlhairtruth.com

L’Oréal denies any wrongdoing, but has agreed to a class action lawsuit settlement to resolve the litigation.

Class Members of the L’Oréal class action settlement include all consumers nationwide who purchased the L’Oréal products for personal, family or household use on or after August 30, 2008. There is no monetary benefit for Class Members. Instead, L’Oréal has agreed to remove from the labeling of these hair products the following “claims”:

  • “for sale only in professional beauty salons”;
  • “exclusive salon distribution”;
  • “exclusive to Kérastase consultant salons”;
  • “only professional”;
  • “only in salon”;
  • “sold exclusively in salons”;
  • “available only at fine salons and spas”;
  • “available only at fine salons”; and
  • similar claims in English or other languages which may be read as suggesting availability for purchase exclusively in professional salons.

Since there is no monetary benefit for Class Members, there is no claim filing deadline. If you wish to object to the L’Oréal product class action settlement, you must do so by September 11, 2013.

Will the industry inform you about this?

NO THEY WONT, MY FRIENDS.

THEY WILL NOT!

Because the industry is L’oreal, And they do not want you to know any wrong about these companies. God Forbid they would reach out to you and explain the particulars of this lawsuit and tell you how to apply for claims.

Gerard Scarpaci, Joshua Flowers, Javier VanHuss Show there true professionalism on Hairbrained.me!

Beautiful Lies
My dear friends please excuse the language from these individuals this is a editorial about my first documentary, “The Real Hair Truth” from a blog called Hairbrained.me.
 
 Reply by Javier VanHuss on December 6, 2010 at 6:27pm
the only real hair truth here is that you are probably one of those dudes who has a couple buttons missing from the top of your shirt, peddling your industry “know how” through whatever book or dvd it is that you cooked up.you dont know anything about my payment formula, my in salon education program, or much else for that matter.this industry is much like the railroads of america, built on cheap labor that helps everyone for the greater good. sure, im using young kids fresh out of beauty school instead of chinese immigrants, but thats neither here nor there.the only thing really bringing me down right now is fuckdumps like you who try to tell everyone what the “real truth” is, when you probably dont have a fucking clue yourself.eat shit.

Permalink Reply by Michael Sean Georgianni on December 9, 2010 at 4:42pm

When I started just eight years ago, I assisted for two years with two to three other jobs to pay my bills. I did this just so I could get a better than school education. I’m just now opening my own salon from scratch. People booth rent mostly because they want to scam on their taxes and not take any responsibility as a group. As far as education goes, it’s your responsibility when you take a job, to see if it’s really being offered. I still buy food and everything else just the way it was first made up.So why shouldn’t I have the same payment structure that has be working for this long? Even before lazy, crying stylist who can’t promote themselves. It’s called business and if you can’t do it then shut it. It is very hard to get the proper training to be a great hair stylist and it’s very hard to own your own business. So the real hair truth is man up and get yours with pride. Just like the rest of us.

Permalink Reply by nicole ely on December 10, 2010 at 6:45am

I am sure there are lazy crying employees not matter where you work.  Sometimes they are lazy and sometimes they are crying because of work organization and conditions.  Wow! it is sad to realize that this seems to be the common thought about stylists on this subject.  Hopefully, this is a statement of a few and not the majority.

I think sylists attitude can be directly related to their environment, pay structure and lack of benefits.  Some salon’s take a large percentage of the ticket plus a large service charge on top of that.  How this is managed is directly related to how attutdes are in salon’s.  Why should syslists not push for the highest pay, best benefits and a well run business.  Do we strive for this?  No, it’s commission we want. Why not get the added benefits if offered?  Some are offering and the one’s who can afford it are organized, successful work environments.  I have felt first hand the struggle of a new business owner to get employee’s to work for little to nothing.  In reality something appealing has to be offered, because the competion for good hairstylists is great.  Don’t forget the noncompetes and lack of access to client info in case you decide to go elsewhere.

It seems desperate to make the statement that stylists are lazy freeloaders just because they don’t want to go into a businesss (that they don’t know) and be expected to build the business for nothing or on the hope they might get one of their three walk in’s a day.

Permalink Reply by nicole ely on December 6, 2010 at 2:37pm

One thing I found out about myself is that I was alot better hairstylist than owner and manager. That is why there are hair salon’s on every corner. Just because you are a good hairstylist does not mean you should own a business. There are so many out there starving for hairstylists and assistants. Not all of us are going to be an Arrojo and so on. If you are unable to get people to work for you at commission only, and you can’t pay people to work for you. You are paying an enormous amount for booth rent. 😦
Permalink Reply by Todd Phillip on December 6, 2010 at 7:14pm
It really comes down to what kind of a business you run.If you are a new business and have little overflow of new clientele, with under capitalized business funding for PR and Marketing which would bring that flow to the table…I would have to say there would be no way to provide a “base guarantee”…I would never use the word salary as it is separate from a commissioned employee.With that being said the simple answer to such an applicant would be you would feed him when you can but he would need to be proactive in self-promotion and you as a business owner would need to give a better percentage on the commission…but no guarantee as that would be needed for business cost and development.
As for the statement said that the salon is responsible for 20% of the clientele,..It sound out of proportion but then again there are different business structures..if that is the case and the stylist is providing 80% of the clientele then it would be likely that the stylist would have a high commission percentage, and vis/versa

Permalink Reply by Javier VanHuss on December 7, 2010 at 1:10pm

so, what IS the % of clientele that a salon owner is responsible to provide? if the answer is above 50%, then whats the point of urging stylists to promote themselves?i opened a salon for one reason, because i couldnt find a place to work. bottom line. i never wanted to be an owner, and to tell you the truth i struggle with it. but im doing the best i can in a cut throat industry, where i literally have 6 competitors within walking distance.my initial question was because i am encountering a LARGE amount of applicants from Paul Mitchell The School (a couple miles down the road), who don’t even feel like they need to assist (a whole other discussion) and who think that they can make 100K in their first year out of school because thats what they have seen on stage.when i assisted, in like 2001-2002, you got hourly as an assistant and then once that was done, you were on your own. i worked for a chain (30+ salons) and that was the way it was in the entire company.
i had never even heard of salary for a stylist until about 4 years ago, when a salon i had previously worked for was paying stylists an hourly wage and that was it. no commission on top of that, and you were basically a slave to the salon. sure, great if you had a slow day/week but not much room for advancement.
the only other place i had heard of an hourly wage was Supercutz, etc.

Permalink Reply by JoshXO Fighting!!! on December 8, 2010 at 10:32pm

BWAHHAAHAHAHA….. wow. I have never seen such blatent Douchebaggery in all my years on the internet. Lets go ahead and break your post down now, shall we?It is very sad to see you profile picture matches your IQ, Business owners like you (wannabee) will not ever rise to the cream of the crop. Your listing on this site reminds me of someone who has to been heard and seen because of your lack of professional knowledge and talent. When did you start to become a writer, maybe you should try something else like cleaning toilettes which matches your mouth’s aptitude.. Well after a quick Google search I wanted to see what kind of work Mr. Kellner “Crusader of Hairdressers” actually does. A person I had never “seen” or “heard” of until he came to my favorite little corner of the internet and started peddling his piece of shit “LOOK AT ME!!!” project. HERE ARE SOME OF HIS HAIRDRESSING GEMS AND SKILLS EVERYONE!
 .
Sir if that is the best you can muster after 24 years of being a hairdresser I suggest you should be the one cleaning toilets. You should fire your photographer even though I like her sweet side pony.

I am an owner of 3 salons, Yelp search came up with 1. Unless you own a couple of Fantastic Sam’s franchises. 2 films ( all that have been in film festivals.) Your years in gay porn don’t count. bachelors degree (marketing), What did they teach you? To go on to community sites and spam every thread with pleas for people to buy your movie? Seriously dude go back and ask them for a refund…. I’ll wait. 24 years of being a hairdresser. It appears your skill set stop evolving after 10 years. It looks like around 1993 you just said “Fuck it. Im gonna do hair this same way for the rest of my life!” Congratulations dude you wasted almost a quarter of a century doing ugly hair. HIGH FIVE BRO!!! head of the Miss Universe pageants. There is just so much to rip on here about this dog and pony show that’s a cut-rate Miss America pageant, But, I think you just stating it made you look dumb enough. Lets move on. If you need to post a question to get the answers to a simple question you need to leave my profession.

Ya know broseph, THATS WHAT THIS PLACE IS ALL ABOUT. Maybe your to busy pushing your movie to actually read any of the content. But harebrained is a COMMUNITY where hairdressers should feel comfortable posting questions and having other people CONTRIBUTE with their experience and helpful advice. Something you obviously know nothing about. Here’s a link to all the discussions Kellener has replied to and how helpful He’s been http://www.hairbrained.me/forum/topic/listForContributor?user=lzkxf…nothing but peddling. Also please stop staying “My profession” if I am in “Your” profession I’m just going to start calling myself a racecar driver that happens to do hair.I thank you for your blog post and I will encourage professionals to see the example you portray to young professional, and veterans. I’m sure if they had a choice between being an angry fucked like Jav or an irrelevant hypocrite like yourself they would pick Jav.

And by the way I am laughing all the way to the bank everyday for the worldwide sales of my film Selling the backlog of copies that didn’t sell and were sitting in your garage at a flea market in Tijuana is hardly “Worldwide” We help people we don’t belittle them and we tell the story of the profession the way it is! Wow your original post to Jav is in total contrast to this statement oh the ugly face of hypocrisy.

Cant take the truth? Hit the road asshole. No you’re the one coming off like an asshole. Please get the fuck off the internet your just making yourself look worse. A portion of the proceeds from this Documentary will go to a Non-Profit fund for Hairdressers who cannot afford Advanced Education. Why not just give them a copy of your movie? If its as good as you think it is they could afford their own advance training. Perhaps you should keep all the money to yourself and go back to beauty school. Twenty Scholarships will be given out nationwide for licensed Professionals. Videos. Books, Websites, Laptops, and also Advanced Training courses. Seriously dude now your trying to hard. I really dont think with your education or thought patterns you could compete with this project. I poop out a super lowbudget show 3 times a week FOR FREE that I’m sure people get more out of than you little “Movie”

Best Regards.

Go fuck yourself

Ps Brosef Kellener before you decide to get INFRONT of a camera again may I suggest

Permalink Reply by JoshXO Fighting!!! on December 9, 2010 at 12:54am

Oh yeah forgot this fucking gem
The Really Shitty Hair Truth from a fucking senior portrait specialist.
Love the yellow brassy tones there Broseph. Now I’m reeling LOLing about the “My Profession” thing.
Since when was under processed bleach at all professional?
And when typing LOL i really mean it. Some people just type it in text but when I read what you write then see the hair, I really am Laughing Out Loud. You’re the biggest joke and thank you for making my day!!

Permalink Reply by Jose Raphael on January 15, 2011 at 7:51am

Thanks’ ..”That Was Great!

Permalink Reply by Glynn Cathro on February 1, 2011 at 5:16am

I agree!

Permalink Reply by Javier VanHuss on December 9, 2010 at 1:17pm

yes, you’re right. i AM a “wannabee”. i WANT TO BE a successful business owner, and as such i was asking for some feedback/advice. YOU are the asshole who jumped on the attack from post 1. i hope you have some extra toilet paper for that new asshole Señor Flowers just ripped you.
I don’t give a fuck about your “accomplishments”. people who feel the need to list stuff like that are generally compensating for the lack of something else.
im not looking to be an example to anyone. im trying to build MY business MY way. like Sinatra, or Tony Montana, but less ethnic.
you don’t know anything about my background, my education, or my knowledge. just because i don’t wear paisley shirts or pointy shoes doesn’t mean i cant cut a circle around walking fossils like you. but hey, thanks for trying to “help” someone new to a certain side of the industry. makes you look like a real hero, and totally enforces those “accomplishments”

Permalink Reply by Gerard Scarpaci on December 9, 2010 at 1:37pm

i think the Real Hair Truth is you can’t put 8500 hairdressers together without some sparks flying!
the real hair truth.comThank you Hairbrained.me for your kind comments, may god bless you each and every day!
Best Regards
Joseph Kellner