Tag: stylist

Chaz Dean Is In Trouble!

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A celebrity hairstylist is at the center of a lawsuit involving people from all over the country who have come forward to claim that his hair-care products have caused them scalp irritation, hair loss and more.  Tanya Norman, who also specializes in brand development for a creative agency, is one of these people. Six months after trying the WEN hair product, Norman says she was alarmed at what happened.  “I had started to get a bald spot, and then I found another one in the back, and that’s when I kind of started to get worried,” Norman said. “I started bawling. I couldn’t stop crying.”  Now, attorney Amy Davis is representing nearly 200 plaintiffs from over 40 different states who are part of a mass-action lawsuit against WEN by Chaz Dean Inc.

“Some of the men and women that we represented, looks like they had a weed whacker taken to their head,” Davis described. “Just hair breaking all over.”  Dean, who developed the WEN hair-product line, has a hair-care studio in Hollywood, and celebrities such as Brooke Shields, Angie Harmon.  Davis, however, states that the product traps dirt, oil and debris in the hair follicle and causes scalp irritation.   Davis went on to claim that the celebrity endorsements made women, men and even children believe in the product.  “Their testimonials and Mr. Dean saying that he is the stylist to the who’s-who in Hollywood really made these men and women believe they could trust the product,” Davis said. “Kiddos, kiddos that we represent, have lost nearly all of their hair.”

While  Mr. Dean declined to be interviewed on camera, they released a statement that reads:

“We take great pride in the quality of our products and believe every product meets our high standards. We want all of our customers to have positive experiences with our products. With well over 10 million WEN products shipped since 2008, our customers’ overwhelmingly positive response to WEN is a testament to there benefits it can deliver for its users. These benefits are reflected in consistently high rankings from independent consumer product sites as well. Importantly, there is no scientific evidence to support any claim that our hair care products caused anyone to lose their hair. There are many reasons why individuals may lose their hair, all unrelated to WEN hair products. We intend to vigorously contest the allegations made against our products. And, we encourage any customer with any questions to contact us.”  Norman, meanwhile, now applies a topical medicine and has received 14 cortisone injections in her bald spots. She says that despite her embarrassment, she believes going public with her experience may help others.

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“The hair that’s regrowing is very, very fine and brittle. This is something that for me has been very, very embarrassing,” Norman said. “There are a lot of us out there that have been dealing with this issue. You’re not alone.”

The federal judge has issued a stay in the case, and the parties are proceeding to mediation.

 

“WHAT A SMALL WORLD!”

“WHAT A SMALL WORLD!”

Close to a year ago, a woman on the other side of the country, contacted me after reading my blog.
At first I was concerned. Why would a stranger want to talk to me? She does not know me, she’s never heard of me, we have no friends in common. I wondered if it would be rude, not to respond to her requests to speak directly. What do I do? Do I even really get how small the internet makes this entire world?
Fast forward…I gotta follow my gut! Something in her last private message behooved me to pick up the phone. Will she answer? NO!
We can never be too hasty. No sooner than I assume that I probably should not be talking to this woman, who I know nothing about….my mobile phone rings. Something compels me to pick up. Why won’t I let it go to voicemail?
Let me tell you about my experience of spending approximately an hour on the phone with a fellow stylist. A stranger to me. This woman is a pure artist. She cannot deal with big business mucking up our industry, due to greed.
Her raw passion for what we do, is felt immensely, all the way from California. Speaking to her, makes West Michigan feel like a stones throw away.
When you have the privilege of finding one so passionate for protecting the integrity that this industry deserves, how do you behave in an apathetic manner?
She cannot sit silently while big business sneaks dangerous poisons into our products, all for the almighty dollar. This poor baby, tried to take this nightmare on.
Listening to her frustrations with the behind the scenes horrors, cover-ups, and greed, that she has endured, makes me even more convinced of my truth.
Focus on what you can control. Work hard to reach one heart and mind at a time. Thinking big, does not imply talking big necessarily, but making a big impact on whatever audience is willing to listen to us.
KNOWLEDGE IS NOT POWER! The implementation of knowledge is our only hope. When we really want to make an impact…find like minds to communicate with on a smaller platform.
Why not just begin, with performing an amazing service behind our styling chair? Why don’t we begin with educating our own clientele about the tricks of our trade, the trends, techniques, technology and tools, that make us so proud to be a part of this hair mafia.
The last thing the rat race needs is another rat. Keep playing with the nice kids. After all, because of the internet…WHAT A SMALL WORLD? Signing off!

This blog was written by DN Speaks

You Should know FDA Authority Over Beauty/Cosmetics

 
Sorry everyone I’m not selling hair care, or teaching haircuts, or color but what I can give you is information that you should know. I have been in the Beauty/Cosmetic industry for well over 25 years and take it from me, a product is here yesterday and gone tomorrow. In Cosmetology school there is a lack of education being given to the student on laws of products, what a manufacturer can say and not say ie (labeling, ingredient’s). What governmental agency’s are there for the protection of the independent stylist and also for the salon employee. Many, many individuals will set up blogs, websites telling you how to overcome customer relations, how to hair color, how to haircutting, and often these individuals will set up a class telling you how to make a ‘Facebook page”. I see this alot at the beauty shows in my industry. But I never really see the hard facts being given to the professional. Its easy to skirt the issues of the beauty industry, “Keep the dumb”, I say. Which to me is so very sad. Many of my fellow professionals are given a line of BS, and are insulted by manufacturers and so-called beauty icons and magazine and websites. Not really taking the issues that are needed for change in my industry, Product knowledge is what they will get and only enough education to buy a product the manufacturers are pushing. Below is important information you should know about the FDA, and how it will help you within your profession. Never, never take the sales persons,distributors or manufactures word as law in the beauty/cosmetic industry, investigate on your own and come to your on conclusions. And if you see a so-called beauty industry “ICON’ pushing a product, WATCHOUT, they are basically being paid to SELL that product!
What does the law say about cosmetic safety and labeling?
The two most important laws pertaining to cosmetics marketed in the United States are the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act1 (FD&C Act) and the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act2 (FPLA). The Food, Drug & Cosmetic Act prohibits the marketing of adulterated or misbranded cosmetics in interstate commerce. Violations of the Act involving product composition–whether they result from ingredients, contaminants, processing, packaging, or shipping and handling–cause cosmetics to be adulterated and subject to regulatory action.
 
Under the FD&C Act, a cosmetic is adulterated if–
“it bears or contains any poisonous or deleterious substance which may render it injurious to users under the conditions of use prescribed in the labeling thereof, or under conditions of use as are customary and usual” [with an exception made for hair dyes];
“it consists in whole or in part of any filthy putrid, or decomposed substance”;
“it has been prepared, packed, or held under insanitary conditions whereby it may have become contaminated with filth, or whereby it may have been rendered injurious to health”;
“its container is composed, in whole or in part, of any poisonous or deleterious substance which may render the contents injurious to health”; or except for hair dyes, “it is, or it bears or contains, a color additive4 which is unsafe within the meaning of section 721(a)” of the FD&C Act. (FD&C Act, sec. 601).
 
Improperly labeled or deceptively packaged products are considered misbranded and subject to regulatory action. Under the FD&C Act, a cosmetic is considered misbranded if–
“its labeling is false or misleading in any particular”;
“its label does not include all required information;
“the required information is not adequately prominent and conspicuous;
“its container is so made, formed, or filled as to be misleading”;
“it is a color additive, other than a hair dye, that does not conform to applicable regulations issued under section 721 of the FD&C Act; and
“its packaging or labeling is in violation of an applicable regulation issued pursuant to section 3 or 4 of the Poison Prevention Packaging Act of 1970.” (FD&C Act, sec. 602)
In addition, under the authority of the FPLA, FDA requires an ingredient declaration to enable consumers to make informed purchasing decisions. Cosmetics that fail to comply with the FPLA are considered misbranded under the FD&C Act. It is important to understand that Congress passes the laws that govern the United States. To put those laws into effect, Congress authorizes certain government agencies, including FDA, to create and enforce regulations, but only as authorized under the law. A change in FDA’s statutory authority over cosmetics would require Congress to change the law.
Does FDA approve cosmetics before they go on the market?
FDA’s legal authority over cosmetics is different from other products regulated by the agency, such as drugs, biologic, and medical devices. Cosmetic products and ingredients are not subject to FDA premarket approval authority, with the exception of color additives. However, FDA may pursue enforcement action against violative products, or against firms or individuals who violate the law.
Must cosmetic manufacturers register with FDA?
Manufacturers are not required to register their cosmetic establishments, file data on ingredients, or report cosmetic-related injuries to FDA. However, companies are encouraged to register their establishments and file Cosmetic Product Ingredient Statements with FDA’s Voluntary Cosmetic Registration Program11 (VCRP).
Can FDA inspect cosmetic manufacturers?
FDA can and does inspect cosmetic manufacturing facilities10 to assure cosmetic product safety and determine whether cosmetics are adulterated or misbranded under the FD&C Act or FPLA.
What actions can FDA take against firms that market adulterated or misbranded cosmetics?
FDA may take regulatory action if it has information to support that a cosmetic is adulterated or misbranded. The agency can pursue action through the Department of Justice in the federal court system to remove adulterated and misbranded cosmetics from the market. To prevent further shipment of an adulterated or misbranded product, the agency may request a federal district court to issue a restraining order against the manufacturer or distributor of the violative cosmetic. Violative cosmetics may be subject to seizure. FDA also may initiate criminal action against a person violating the law. In addition, FDA works closely with the U.S. Customs and Border Protection8 to monitor imports. Under section 801(a) of the FD&C Act, imported cosmetics9 are subject to review by FDA at the time of entry through U.S. Customs. Products that do not comply with FDA laws and regulations are subject to refusal of admission into the United States. Violative products must be brought into compliance (if feasible), destroyed, or re-exported. FDA takes regulatory action based upon agency priorities, consistent with public health concerns and available resources.
 
Can FDA order the recall of a hazardous cosmetic from the market?
Recalls of cosmetics are voluntary actions taken by manufacturers or distributors to remove from the marketplace products that represent a hazard or gross deception, or that are somehow defective. FDA categorizes a firms action as a recall (as opposed to a market withdrawal) when it determines that the product hazard or defect represents a violation of the FD&C Act. FDA is not authorized to require recalls of cosmetics but does monitor companies that conduct a product recall and may request a product recall if the firm is not willing to remove dangerous products from the market without FDA’s written request. Recalls are addressed in Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), sections 7.40 through 7.59.
Who is responsible for substantiating the safety of cosmetics?
Cosmetic firms are responsible for substantiating the safety of their products and ingredients before marketing. Failure to adequately substantiate the safety of a cosmetic product or its ingredients prior to marketing causes the product to be misbranded unless the following warning statement appears conspicuously on the principal display panel of the product’s label:
“Warning–The safety of this product has not been determined.” (21 CFR 740.10)
In addition, regulations prohibit or restrict the use of several ingredients5 in cosmetic products and require warning statements6 on the labels of certain types of cosmetics. In general, except for color additives and those ingredients which are prohibited or restricted from use in cosmetics by regulation, a manufacturer may use any ingredient in the formulation of a cosmetic provided that the ingredient and the finished cosmetic are safe, the product is properly , and the use of the ingredients does not otherwise cause the cosmetic to be adulterated or  under the laws that FDA enforces.
 
Joseph Kellner Hairdresser/Mua/Film Producer

That How It Is, Here!

I was wondering around on Craigslist and looking at the salon/spa positions available for a motivated individual to seek work in this field. There were plenty to go around for a professional to find gainful employment in our beauty industry. Here is a good listing.

You’ve spent at least 1200 hours in education, Thousands of dollars to get trained for a career in cosmetology. Maybe even started your career in a salon but just can’t seem to get it launched. Somethings missing…..Well if you’re motivated, upbeat, and ready to make things happen, then Allure, A Michael Clopton Salon is for you!
We don’t just hire you and let you fall, we work with proven systems to assist you in building your career goals. Here are just a few ways we are different from other salons…

We provide
“True” insalon education… free to you!
Teach you how to build your guest list
Onsite Paul Mitchell National Educator for day-to-day education and daily resource
Goal setting and planning
Insalon Coaching
Teach you how to turn your training into a career, not a job!

You will need…(MUST HAVE/BE)

Reliable transportation
Upbeat and Motivated Energy
A Passion to Learn
responsible and Dependable
Works well with People and is NICE!

I called this seeking information on the position. “Can you give me the information for this Position at your salon, please”.  ‘Well tell me want you are looking for”. So I explained to him which he identified himself as the salon owner that I merely asking him about the POSITION. He said “It is part-time or full-time, no benefits, no wages, no insurance, no sick pay, Not even GAS MONEY!” He also went on to say “This is how it is here”. When a future stylist is coming into the professional and also when a veteran stylist is seeking employment they need to be compensated for their time. Commission just does not cut it in this profession any more. People are paying large sums for a beauty school education. And in the modern picture we all have to pay our bills. And commission does not cut it!

If you walk off the street and go into a WENDYS Restuarant, you will receive this as a starting employee with the corporation.  

  • Comprehensive health insurance with health savings account feature
  • Optional dental and vision insurance coverage
  • 401(k) with company match
  • Life and disability insurance
  • Optional supplemental life insurance for employee, spouse and children
  • Flexible spending account
  • Payroll direct deposit
  • Employee assistance program
  • Adoption assistance program
  • Relocation assistance
  • Employee meal discounts
  • Paid vacation
  • Paid personal and holiday time
  • Service recognition programs
  • Competitive wages
  • Free uniforms*
  • Free or discounted meals
  • Flexible hours
  • Medical insurance*
  • Prescription drug coverage*
  • 24-hour nurse line access
  • Vision discount*
  • Available dental*

Additional Benefits

  • Short-term disability*
  • Term life insurance*
  • 401(k)*
  • Paid holidays*
  • Vacation*

Jon Gonzalez who writes on his own website Hairdresser Career Development Systems Likes to shuffles the buck on the New beauty school student who graduates and I quote, “Sadly many new beginners fail to maximize their full potential, due to unrealistic career and earning expectations before they even give their new career a chance to grow, they want to run before they learn to walk. Many believe that graduating from beauty school will prepare them for a competitive and changing job market. “Yeah that’s right Jon blame it on the graduating student and the beauty school”.  Either way in this industry you have bills to pay and you need to be compensated for your work. And so lets all pass the buck to these new, non educated, brainwashed individuals and say,”That How It Is, Here!”

AND FRANKLY YOU DESERVE IT!!!

 

 

Dr. Frank Elliott Donor For The Real Hair Truth Scholarships!

Dr. Frank Elliott is a hairdresser and make-up artist with over thirty years of experience. His industry titles include: manufacturer’s technical representative, platform artist, competition artist, chief proctor for the Pennsylvania State Board of Cosmetology, and salon owner.

Dr. Frank earned his PhD. in Workforce Education and Development from The Pennsylvania State University, where he was a lecturer for ten years. He has taught Leadership and Professional Development for state and federal government, university, and industry organizations.

Dr. Frank has just released a ground breaking new book The Other Side of Hairdressing. “The Other Side” is where beauty professionals tap into and take control of the innate learning functions that serve us throughout our lives. Expand your client market-base, supercharge your career, and realize your true earning potential on The Other Side of Hairdressing.

The Other Side of Hairdressing
As a teaching tool for salon owners, get your new hire off to a running start with The Other Side of Hairdressing. Have them read Linda’s story and then monitor their progress as they move through the Taking Control section. Slash the time usually needed for developing a new stylist so they can become a valuable part of your salon team now.
As a learning tool for new salon employees, give yourself an edge you’ll never regret. Don’t sit around waiting for experience to come to you. Take Control of your own professional situation now. You know what you want. You have a dream. Learn from The Other Side of Hairdressing how to get to your dream.

As a team-building tool for experienced hairdressers, get the salon team onto common ground by sharing ideas about The Other Side of Hairdressing. Discuss your new adventures and grow together. Share your successes in furthering your Beauty career, work and live on The Other Side of Hairdressing! Is based on a philosophy of taking control of your career through self-understanding and choice.

The Real Hair Truth Thanks Frank Elliott for his donations.