Why Do You Use Gorilla Glue?

I am hearing more and more about how people in the salon are having there wigs and pieces glued on now with very strong industrial adhesives. Such as gorilla. I would never have thought professionals in the beauty would use such a product. But they are. This can be a health risk for women and also can lead to severe skin disfiguration. Now the cost of beauty should not be that high. And the wants and needs of a individual should not be so reckless.  Special effect makeup uses alot of industrial glues, but the safe thing about it they apply a scalp mask first. This way it is in no contact with the human skin. These glues are very very strong and also flammable. Imagine smoking with this applied to your scalp and you catch on fire, even smelling the fumes could be a serious hazard to some people.

Here is a interesting mishap I found on ModelMayhem.com check it out ladies.

“My neighbor (seriously, it isn’t me) has accidentally got Gorilla Glue on her hair and scalp. She is now trying to get it out. She called the manufacturer and their customer service told her to put baby oil on it and then wash it without rubbing it. Personally, I would go with what the manufacturer says but she is afraid to put water on it because the last time she had a Gorilla Glue mishap (really, how many Gorilla Glue accidents can you have in one summer?), when she glued a tile in the wrong location, customer service told her that water would make it set forever. She has put coconut oil on it as she didn’t have any baby oil. She has waist length hair and doesn’t want to cut it. She asked me what to do and I said I would ask around.”

Don’t use it everyone it’s not worth it!

Chaz Dean Is In Trouble!

xwvrRwa

A celebrity hairstylist is at the center of a lawsuit involving people from all over the country who have come forward to claim that his hair-care products have caused them scalp irritation, hair loss and more.  Tanya Norman, who also specializes in brand development for a creative agency, is one of these people. Six months after trying the WEN hair product, Norman says she was alarmed at what happened.  “I had started to get a bald spot, and then I found another one in the back, and that’s when I kind of started to get worried,” Norman said. “I started bawling. I couldn’t stop crying.”  Now, attorney Amy Davis is representing nearly 200 plaintiffs from over 40 different states who are part of a mass-action lawsuit against WEN by Chaz Dean Inc.

“Some of the men and women that we represented, looks like they had a weed whacker taken to their head,” Davis described. “Just hair breaking all over.”  Dean, who developed the WEN hair-product line, has a hair-care studio in Hollywood, and celebrities such as Brooke Shields, Angie Harmon.  Davis, however, states that the product traps dirt, oil and debris in the hair follicle and causes scalp irritation.   Davis went on to claim that the celebrity endorsements made women, men and even children believe in the product.  “Their testimonials and Mr. Dean saying that he is the stylist to the who’s-who in Hollywood really made these men and women believe they could trust the product,” Davis said. “Kiddos, kiddos that we represent, have lost nearly all of their hair.”

While  Mr. Dean declined to be interviewed on camera, they released a statement that reads:

“We take great pride in the quality of our products and believe every product meets our high standards. We want all of our customers to have positive experiences with our products. With well over 10 million WEN products shipped since 2008, our customers’ overwhelmingly positive response to WEN is a testament to there benefits it can deliver for its users. These benefits are reflected in consistently high rankings from independent consumer product sites as well. Importantly, there is no scientific evidence to support any claim that our hair care products caused anyone to lose their hair. There are many reasons why individuals may lose their hair, all unrelated to WEN hair products. We intend to vigorously contest the allegations made against our products. And, we encourage any customer with any questions to contact us.”  Norman, meanwhile, now applies a topical medicine and has received 14 cortisone injections in her bald spots. She says that despite her embarrassment, she believes going public with her experience may help others.

wen-by-chaz-dean_featured

“The hair that’s regrowing is very, very fine and brittle. This is something that for me has been very, very embarrassing,” Norman said. “There are a lot of us out there that have been dealing with this issue. You’re not alone.”

The federal judge has issued a stay in the case, and the parties are proceeding to mediation.

 

Defective Products May Cause Serious Personal Injury

The beautiful LiesYou can see the advertisements on television all the time—women running their fingers through their hair, happy because they have dyed their hair to a “brilliant” color. But what happens if the hair dye is a defective product? After all, hair dye contains chemicals that come in close contact not only with your scalp, but with your eyes, nose and mouth, creating the potential for a serious personal injury. Some women say they suffered severe burns after using hair products, including dyes and relaxers.

According to the FDA, some problems reported from hair dyes include hair loss, burning, redness, itchy or raw skin, swelling in the face and trouble breathing. Sometimes, the issue is an allergic reaction, and the FDA warns that such a reaction can occur even after years of using a hair dye product.

Some lawsuits have been filed against hair dye makers, alleging their product caused women to permanently lose their hair. In 2006, a lawsuit was filed against Procter & Gamble, alleging that Clairol “Nice ‘n Easy” hair dye left the plaintiff with chemical burns on her scalp and caused her hair to fall out.

Hair dye chemical burns do not just happen at home. In fact, lawsuits have been filed against salons alleging that clients suffered chemical burns during hair dye treatments. In 2014, a woman filed a $12,000 lawsuit, alleging she suffered a severe chemical burn to her scalp. Her lawsuit seeks expenses for medical care as well as damages for physical and mental pain and suffering.  An article in the FDA’s Consumer magazine notes that hair straighteners and hair dyes are among the agency’s Office of Cosmetics and Colors top consumer complaint areas. Although some complaints are caused by misuse of the product, others may be related to the product itself, and reactions vary from hair breakage to emergency room visits. According to the FDA article, there have been cases where products were labeled as “chemical free” when they actually contained ingredients that most people would consider “chemicals.” In those cases, the products were eventually removed from the market or had their labels changed.  Chemical burns can be incredibly painful and can have severe consequences for victims. They can take a long time to heal, putting patients at risk for infections. The recovery can be expensive, requiring various medicines, including steroids, to heal the burns and creams to stop the pain. Of course, there is also the emotional impact associated with such chemical burns. The scarring of the head and face can be emotionally traumatic for a person, leading to depression and anxiety.

In cases where a defective product has caused personal injury, it is possible to file a lawsuit to hold the company accountable for putting a defective product on the market.