Tag: MAKE UP ARTISTS

Salons Need Employees/Employees Need Pay

I Have been a Hairdresser/Makeup Artist in the Beauty Industry for 30 years now. And I have never, ever seen a industry that takes advantage of there employee’s before in my whole professional life. The sit and wait policy is still going on in the industry. Which means you will wait for a walk-in client and get no pay what so ever. Not even a salary for someone first starting out in the profession. Owners will ask you to answer the phone, fold towels, sweep the floor, dust the retail shelves and all sorts of free labor they can get out of you. It’s called taking advantage of a human being. Getting what they can for nothing. Is the usual norm in the Beauty Industry. Look at Great Clips they are a tip based company and nothing more. You are required to clean the salon, answer the phone, fight with others for a walk-in customer, dust shelves, do laundry and close the store for only tips. And they will say they give you $9.00 a hour which if you go through your payroll check you are just getting tips. If they gave you $9.00 a hour plus tips you would be getting something to at least pay for your gas and electric bill.

In no other professional industry are you required to work for free. And they are expected to do free labor. Employee’s need to stop this way of abuse. With the Covid Virus running throughout the United States a lot of Beauty Industry Professionals decide to sit and wait it out and receive federal and state unemployment. Which for some was close to $800.00 biweekly. Finally receiving a decent wage for once, they took the time to really look at re-training and moving into a better profession. Having taken the time to see value in there work and taking professional responsibility in there training and advanced training. What more could a employer ask for. In the beauty Industry to a employer it means nothing. How can a person go to work worrying about there rent, insurance, daycare, food, etc. Beauty Industry owners do not care, they have to over head to worry about and will categorize you a a commission employee to stay away from tax’s. But will expect from the employee to do the responsibility’s of a paid employee.

So having a commission employee means nothing to a salon owner, they have to pay no salary, and will not worry about YOU. Even if you have to pay for your mortgage or buy groceries. The salon owner simply collects profit from the hair dresser. Simple scheme. And if you are going to get a salary you will be doing everything and even see your hours cut. And probably let employees go. The times need to change for all.

If you go on Indeed.com you will see a abundance of Beauty Industry jobs posted by Sport Clips, Great Clips, HairCuttery, JCPenneys, Regis Corporation, Hair Masters. They are on a constant basis asking for Stylists, Asst Managers and Managers. WHY? Because they do not pay there employee’s at all. Not even nickels and dimes. Stylist have gotten wise to the profession and come to the conclusion you cannot make a living in it anymore what so ever. Maybe 30 years ago but not anymore. And if you cannot afford to take care of your employees, don’t open a business you will not last long. Restaurant Corporations have become wise now, Hourly wages and higher benefits are abundant, Just look at Target, Walmart, Aldi’s they start there employees at $13.00 hourly now. And if you need a job they are “HIRING” signs all over.

Job’s are plentiful for all now. Wages are better now. But don’t count on making living in the Beauty Industry. The corporations are in control of it all. And they have completely raped it of everything.

A BIG CHANGE IS COMING TO OUR INDUSTRY!

 

 

 

Josephkellner.com

 

Keri Gorder, until recently the manager of a hair salon in Great Falls, Mont., said she was surprised last month by a document that her company wanted stylists to sign.

Ms. Gorder said the salon’s parent company, the Regis Corporation, had urged the four stylists at her salon, Cost Cutters, to sign a document that would seemingly nullify any future support they showed for unionization.

Labor leaders in Montana accuse the company of seeking to take away the stylists’ right to form a union. But Regis says the document merely seeks to ensure that workers choose unions through a secret-ballot election — at a time when unions are pushing legislation in Congress that would make it easy to bypass secret ballots.

The document the stylists at several Montana salons were urged to sign said they were agreeing to revoke any future signature they put on a pro-union card that could be counted as showing support for unionizing.

“I thought it was taking our right away before we ever exercised that right,” Ms. Gorder said.

She said her area supervisor had pressured the stylists to sign the cards. “The area supervisor said, ‘I would do what the company wants you to do,’ ” Ms. Gorder said, adding that she quit her job this month because of her dismay over the situation.

Soon she informed labor leaders about the document, and now they are threatening to picket the salon and hand out pro-union fliers.

“It’s the craziest thing I’ve ever seen,” said Ole Stimac, president of the Central Montana Central Labor Council. “I’ve never seen anything where you sign away your rights for eternity to unionize.”

Regis executives said they had distributed the document out of concern that Congress would enact legislation backed by labor that would require employers to recognize a union as soon as a majority of workers signed pro-union cards, without holding a secret-ballot election.

Paul Finkelstein, chief executive at Regis, the nation’s largest hair salon company, said many employees signed such pro-union cards without understanding that it could commit them to joining a union. Mr. Finkelstein said the company’s focus groups showed that employees overwhelmingly favored using secret ballots to decide whether to join a union.

The document the hair stylists were asked to sign, titled Protection of Secret Vote Agreement, said, “In order to preserve my right to a secret-ballot election, and for my own protection, I knowingly and without restraint and free from coercion sign this agreement revoking and nullifying any union authorization card I may execute in the future.”

Mr. Finkelstein said the document was intended to ensure that the employees’ cards were never counted to show majority support for a union — in case Congress someday enacted the union-card legislation.

“The sole issue is that our people want to use a secret ballot,” he said, asserting that union organizers often manipulate workers into signing pro-union cards, known as authorization cards.

Mr. Finkelstein added: “We’re not threatening people, ‘You’d better sign.’ It’s totally voluntary.”

William B. Gould IV, a Stanford law professor and former chairman of the National Labor Relations Board, said, “It seems like a modernized version of the old yellow dog contract,” a provision, now illegal, that many employers used to push workers to sign, pledging not to join a union as a condition of employment.

Assessing the salon document, Mr. Gould said, “I think it’s illegal because an authorization card is the principal vehicle unions use to organize the unorganized.”

Under current law, at least 30 percent of a workplace’s employees must sign cards to lead to a secret-ballot election. Mr. Gould said that under the Regis document, cards signed to seek a secret ballot would automatically be revoked.

Joseph Kellner Booth Rental Advice

josephkellner.com
josephkellner.com

As a booth renter the owner of the salon has no say as to how you run your business. The salon owner is mostly a landlord and you are the tenant. They should not provide you with phone, towels, products, training or tools, these should all be paid for and provided by yourself. Any repairs or improvements to your area or the salon are negotiable.

If your problem is with walk-ins, many salons do not allow renters to take any salon walk-ins at all. You are responsible for your own advertizing and furnishing your own clients. If you are being treated as an employee, where you are required to answer phones, required to be in the salon specific hours, then you have a problem. First, you should never rent a chair in a salon without having a rental agreement which spells out everything in detail. Get the salons rental agreement BEFORE starting work and sit down with the owner and make sure you understand everything. The major things that should be in any rental agreement are, how much is the rent, when its due and when it can be changed and what exactly is furnished in your rent, how are walk-ins handled, when is the salon available for your use, do you get a key, can you sell your own retail, what services are you allowed to perform, what are your specific cleaning duties. As a booth renter you have certain basic rights. You have the right to schedule your own appointments, determine your own work hours, within the guidelines you agreed upon in your lease and very important, the ability to come and go as you please. You have the right to set your own prices and determine what products you use to perform your services.
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Customer Service Secret Number Two

Haircolorist/Makeup Artist
Haircolorist/Makeup Artist

Customer Service Secret Number Two – provide true customer service. In today’s market environment, service has become a cliché and it seems like “everyone’s doing it.” So, if everyone is doing it, why not jump ahead of the wolf pack by providing even more creative, personalized service to your customers than your competitors can?

One size shoe does not fit all feet. Nor is one type of customer service suitable for all your customers. Let’s say your advertised featured customer service is Home Delivery. The first customer may welcome this Home Delivery because it’s difficult for him to get out and shop in person.

But your second customer may enjoy “window shopping” and carrying his purchases around with him as he goes from shop to shop. He is not the least interested in your home delivery service. So, with what you save by not needing home delivery for this customer, why not offer him an equivalent discount on a second cash purchase, or give him an in-store percentage-off coupon that he can use the next time he’s in your store?

I repeat, be creative. Get to personally know your customers and recognize their individual needs. Above all, make certain that what you are offering really is something that your customer can value; that’s the key to good customer service.

5 Secrets Of Good Customer Service

JosephKellner.com
JosephKellner.com

Customer Service Secret Number One – Build Business to Customer Loyalty. This is my number one customer service secret, and is by far the most important one. I was taught about Business to Customer Loyalty many, many years ago, before I started my own business, when I still worked as a hotel detective in a ritzy down town Calgary hotel. The hotel insisted that every one of us who had contact with their customers know the customer by his full name and, when possible, other personal or business information about him.

“Good evening, Mr. Smith. Welcome to our hotel.” Then, after a bit of miscellaneous chit-chat, “By the way, Mr. Smith, did you manage to unload at a profit those hundred shares of Doodlebug Appliances you thought were a bit risky?” or, “Was your daughter accepted at Harvard? Last time you were a guest with us you expressed concern that Emily was having difficulty with her math, and wasn’t sure if she had enough points to qualify for admission.”

Now, here’s a customer who KNOWS that he’s welcome at your hotel, and whenever he’s back in town, you can count on him staying in your establishment!

Is this spying on customers? Not at all! It’s simply remembering a few concerns that your customer shared with you the last time he stayed in your hotel.

When you can show concern about what matters to your customer, that’s Business to Customer Loyalty, and you can bet on it, you’ve just acquired a customer for life.
More to come.