Beauty Industry Entrepreneurs, who supports them?

Beautiful Lies

You know what is amazing in my industry you can tell the “sheepple” the truth about their industry but they are still sheep. There are a lot of followers in my industry but the people I highlight in my film are true entrepreneurs. They are trying to make a difference within their profession. The manufacturers, so-called organizations, industry websites and magazines go ahead and advertise the (Icons) of the  beauty industry. Don’t get me wrong I love my craft, but the people they advertise as “Icons” are the ones who are doing the brain washing for the financial pyramid, within my industry. I always tell my friends or they ask me, Why do you make these films? There is no money in it!. Or I love this one, You will never make a name for yourself in this industry. I am not looking to be in an beauty industry magazine or website, etc. I follow my own path. God said to us all, “Follow the path less traveled”. And it is true, you have to be your own man or person in this world. And the main moral or value to this is, “Do what you feel is right”.  I have never been a follower in my life, I have my own business (Salon), and I enjoy writing and making Documentary’s.

I am not the best, but I learn from my prior mistakes and enjoy critics.

In my industry the major manufacturers sell to the commercial sector which is basically the consumer.. There was a time when all good hair care products, hair color, hair color treatments were done in the salon and sold only in the salon. This gave our profession more value more respect. But with the birth of the internet. Beauty manufacturers gave notice and realized that they could also sell their products and hair color to the world with little or no expense. Just build a web page and purchase a domain that has nothing to do with the parent company and sell and give next day delivery to the consumer. Little did they know how bad of a hurting they have done to my beauty industry.  Now in the year 2013 you can buy hair color, treatments and such on the internet. And these are the same products that are used in hair salons all over the United States. Yes even the hair color can be bought on the internet and delivered next day to the consumer. Even the keratin treatments can be bought on the internet. So as time went by little did they know (Major Manufacturers) were putting a hurting on my industry. The economy in the U.S is horrible now and clients will say to you I am living up north for a few months can I get my formula. And the hairdresser will give it to them, only to find out they never see them again. They now have the formula and can do it at home. So many professionals will give the manufacturer their loyalty, and there undivided devotion and purchase hair color, etc. from them.  But at the same time knowing the manufacturers make a hair color for the commercial sector to buy.  L’Oreal, Clairol, you name it. So where is the exclusive from the manufacturer to the salon owner or professional? Why would a salon professional buy from a manufacturer and basically they are competing for business with the manufacturer!

Where is the Manufacturer Loyalty?

There is none. And the sad thing about it is the so-called professionals will back up these manufacturers. They don’t realize that putting up a sign on the salon window from L’Oreal, Paul Mitchell, Clairol, that are giving the company free advertising. And they will carry these lines even though they are sold in the mass market. You are in competition with the manufacturer wake up everyone!

Some industry professionals make their own product lines, books, films, makeup etc. These entrepreneurs feel why not put the money in their own pockets instead of supporting the financial pyramid in the cosmetic industry. But it is hard for them to start-up. In an industry dominated by major manufacturers. The manufacturers can buy the movie stars,  do mass marketing etc. Which takes money, money, money. The entrepreneur will either formulate or private label the product line and then finish it. And hopefully will have the finances placed aside for marketing. A lot of entrepreneurs will do it in there local. Which will save on shipping for them.  Business is Business, I accept that. But in my beauty industry, magazines, websites, hair shows will go to the major manufacturers and have them buy advertising space, booth space at their hair shows at monumental prices. The magazines, websites, hair shows do that and charge them. Knowing they can pay that kind of money. The entrepreneur cannot do that.  And those funds sustain the beauty magazines, websites, hair shows. If they did not charge those fee’s they would not have their websites or magazine. Major manufacturers will also pay the magazines, and websites hair color or products’ in place of cash for their payment. The beauty industry magazine’s and websites will go ahead and sell those products’ online to get their money back for the advertising bought by the manufacturer. Believe in what I say soap in this industry is GOLD. An entrepreneur cannot do that so basically who is giving the small guy in the industry a bone? They learn to network together. They follow like-minded people and they blossom. Believe me not to the extent of the “Big Boys”. Because the major manufacturers will keep an eye on them!

Should we not be advertising the new in my professional or keep up feeding the Major Manufacturers who place chemical that are harmful in out products. They are kings of deceptive marketing. And they know how to stretch the law. No worry’s for them. If they get fined by OSHA, or the FDA. It will not even be penny’s to them.  So where does the little guy come in? They cannot afford the fee’s for advertising in an industry magazine on a consistent basis, hair show fee’s are huge, and industry websites only back the big boys on the beauty/ cosmetic industry. Rolling out a spread in an industry magazine for a few months can be the total amount of finances an entrepreneur has for the year. The entrepreneur is done after that. Time to hit the pavement and go door to door.

It’s all a big money pit for everyone except for the little guy (Entrepreneur) in the beauty industry.  They have to tooth and claw for what little they have in my industry.  God forbid you piss off the Big Boys they will stop financing the magazines and hair shows. Then what will we have, I can tell you a true beauty industry. Forget about it. It’s a money pyramid, not even the beauty industry’s so-called organizations could even have the slightest clue. If you look at the PBA most of the board are from manufacturers.  There too busy buying up hair shows and asking for financial help from the Big Boys so they can sustain themselves. They should teach in beauty school how to be your own man. The  entrepreneurs are scattering for the meager pieces of cheese that drop down from the top. And the sad thing about this is the industry professionals are the sheeple in an industry that rapes them each and everyday! They are mere salesmen and women for the Big Boys.

Ask yourself, “Who really is the ASSHOLE, the Manufacturer, Website or Industry magazine.  Who advertise these Big Boys who are sticking it up your ASS each and everyday.

Or is it the Asshole who makes the films to let you know who really is concerned about you.

So tell me who is really the asshole here.?

God forbid we stand up for the right things in our profession.

Best Regards Joseph Kellner

How To Wrestle With Non-Compete Contracts in the Beauty/Cosmetic Industry

The Real Hair Truth Documentary Blog!

 

You’d expect a fat non-compete clause in a top-tier investment banker’s employment contract. Yet more companies of all stripes are foisting non-compete contracts on lower-level lieutenants–and even line workers.

Some employers also use non-disclosure or confidentiality agreements. A non-disclosure agreement helps an organization safeguard its trade secrets and other proprietary information. Under the agreement, employees are prohibited from disclosing this information. Confidentiality agreements are similar, except that the agreement requires that one or both parties must keep information confidential.

“Even though hair stylists aren’t six-figure earners, they are frequently being asked to sign [non-competes],” says David Conforto , an attorney at Conforto Law Group in Boston. Conforto recently won an injunction for a stylist client so she could continue to work; the judge deemed her non-compete contract un-enforceable because of the high demand for qualified stylists.

Employers wield non-competes to stanch turnover and keep a firm grip on proprietary client lists and critical research. And with global competition more fierce than ever, the paranoia is at a fever pitch. Being a member of this so-called professional industry a few words of wisdom from me to you may help you from being deceived from business owners who rent chairs. After your interview make sure you take a copy of the contract to a lawyer, NOT YOUR FRIEND TO READ. But a Lawyer. Sign nothing, and if the owner will not let you take it out of the salon to give to an attorney, they are probably 100% not honest with you. SCAMMERS are abundant in the beauty industry my friends. Do not get your advice on Non-Compete contracts from a beauty industry magazine, beauty industry website, a hair idol, or so-called Icon, but from an attorney licensed in your state. Read On My Friends.

In Pictures: Five Tips For Negotiating Non-Compete Contracts

While you probably can’t avoid having to sign these contracts, you should make every effort to negotiate as much wiggle room as possible. It is your business and you must conduct yourself as a business owner.

First step: Hire an attorney to vet your contract before you sign it. Yes, you might pay $200 to $500 an hour for the privilege, but that’s probably a good bet. The cost of going to trial over a breach of a non-compete typically runs in the tens of thousands of dollars. Even if you do win the case, you don’t recoup those legal fees, as defendants typically do in other cases. If you lose, you’re out of work to boot.

If you’re presented with a non-compete clause, send your potential employer a letter confirming that you are consulting an attorney to make sure you understand all the terms. Declaring that step in writing is important because it prevents the employer from retaliating by swiping the job offer later on. (Judges don’t look too kindly on a move like that.)

In lieu of a traditional non-compete contract, try to angle for a “non-disclosure” or a “non-solicitation” agreement. Non-disclosure agreements stipulate that departing employees can’t make off with valuable research, while non-solicitation agreements prohibit them from going after important clients–except those they cultivated prior to joining the company. If that doesn’t work, focus on winnowing the scope of the non-compete. “The employer is going to push it to be as broad as possible, but you want to make it as restricted as possible without jeopardizing the job offer. Two key elements here: geography and time. Try to limit both. Reasonable restrictions will vary by industry, of course.

For example, temporarily barring a hairstylist from working in an entire county might not be plausible, but shackling a pharmaceutical rep in the same area might. Contracts stating that you can’t work in the industry throughout the U.S. probably won’t hold up in court, although some tech companies may be able to enforce them, because of the global nature of the Internet. The same strategy goes for the time span of the non-compete. The standard window for these contracts is six months to a year. Anything more than two years is downright draconian, and probably won’t hold up in court. Then again, don’t count on a judge to bail you out. “You still have to pay for litigation, or hope that your new employer will pay for it. In a tough economy, that’s a chance you probably don’t want to take. Take my advice my fellow professionals go see a lawyer.

Legal matters

While there are no federal laws directly governing non-compete agreements, some states do address the legality of such agreements. Under Wisconsin law, for example, the agreements must:

  • Be necessary for the protection of the employer;
  • Provide a reasonable time period;
  • Cover a reasonable territory;
  • Not be unreasonable to the employee; and
  • Not be unreasonable to the general public.

Although most states will enforce non-compete agreements if they are “reasonable” in terms of breadth and length of the restriction, the definition of what is “reasonable” varies. When crafting a non-compete agreement, an organization must pay careful attention to the agreement’s scope. An overly limiting agreement may be deemed un-enforceable by state courts.