Why You Shouldn’t Be An Entrepreneur

 

 

When a hopeful entrepreneur asks me advice on beginning a startup, my advice is always the same: Don’t do it. It’s awful.

That is not the full truth. The reality is that it’s difficult to start and run a business. It’s a tremendous investment that takes time, effort and capital. Your focus is always on the business. Fantastic highs give way to horrible lows. It causes drastic mood swings (that might seem irrational to others) and extreme financial stress that few really understand. If someone one is going to make it, they won’t listen to my suggestion and will move full-steam ahead.

If this is the path you go down, there are a few things you should expect.

 

Uneven Work/Life Balance

I’ve always struggled with the work/life balance ratios that people often refer to. I genuinely love the challenges that come with creating a business, so I guess you could say I’ve never worked a day in my life. How is that for balance? But in all seriousness, I am almost constantly thinking about work, whether I’m running, reading, with friends or out with my girlfriend. In the back of my head, I’m going over checklists, thinking up new strategies or applications of new technologies. This can make relationships difficult, as you’re always ducking out to take a phone call, canceling dates or are unable to totally focus on on someone. On the flip side, I’m free to make my own schedule, stepping out to take care of personal things or work remotely if I need to.

An Always Moving Finish Line

There are going to be times where it feels like everyone is trying to prevent you from getting to where you want to be. It is easy to get discouraged and swayed. Entrepreneurs must go into what I call “cut-throat mode.” You need to navigate politics, get buy-in and ultimately arrive at your goal. Chances are, until that goal is achieved, you won’t be happy. And even when that happens, a new goal will inevitably appear to embark upon. To compound matters, there may even be multiple goals at the same time. This can ultimately make it challenging to have fun or do social activities with non-entrepreneurs because there is always something more important, in your mind, to do. After all, time is money, and both can be the difference between success and failure.

To tackle this, try breaking your goals into manageable pieces so they are more actionable. Understanding everything that needs to happen and having a plan for how you will accomplish each step eases the burden.

Always Being ‘On’

As an entrepreneur, you always need to be thinking about how your business is perceived by the mainstream. Because of this, you always need to be “on.” You don’t have the luxury of disclosing issues or problems. In order to protect and propel your organization, your guard always needs to be up — prepared to spin negatives or take advantage of opportunities when they appear. For example, responding to questions like “How is the business going?” is incredibly complex. I always stay positive and keep in mind who is asking. You never know who you are going to meet or what they might know. Make sure you are representing yourself and your company well.

Inevitable Stressors

Most humans fail over and over, and this is generally a good thing as long as you learn from it. However, when running a business, there are a lot of dependencies, and ensuring the bottlenecks you are creating are solved can cause a lot of pressure and stress. For example, missing payroll is a very realistic possibility for most startups. Whatever the situation may be, you are the one who is generally responsible for fixing the problem, and chances are you will not always have the answer.

Is It Worth It?

Being an entrepreneur is one of the best and worst things I’ve decided to do. I’ve learned more than I could have imaged and have been faced with challenging situations I never thought I would have to go through, but I’ve also had a ton of fun. If I could choose a different career path, I wouldn’t. It’s not for everyone, but if you are the type of person who, after reading this, still wants to pursue creating your dream company, good for you. Just remember it will most likely be the hardest thing you’ve ever done, but with perseverance, you might just pull it off.

I am not scared of living my dreams.

Josephkellner.comI have been given many talents and I use those talents. I am not perfect in what I do and also what I say. But I am not scared. I am not scared of living my dreams. Do you go to work everyday and work for someone or do you live your dreams? Fear Is the number one reason entrepreneurs do not succeed in their profession. First of all if you want to “Brand” yourself you must be happy within, spiritually content. Know yourself, know your attributes and talents. Venture in what you know and build on that. We are born with many talents and it is up to us to Grow those seeds you are given. But “Fear” is the biggest road block humans will “Place upon themselves”. I believe that most of the time an entrepreneur will see their idea and say “I cannot do it, or I don’t even know where to start”. But you do, all you have to do is see it in a vision, in your mind. Your start of the vision or dream of course is the idea and it is also the ending. What happens in the middle is the problem for many. Such as “Organization” you have to train yourself to organize your thoughts to achieve your dream to turn it into material and matter. Fear is an excellent asset to have once you overcome it, you can use it for anything in life’s follies. Persistence will also help you, you can do anything you want in life. Consistency has to be there also. It will cost you to sacrifice, or money and your time. But time is what you have. You can sleep when you are dead, start building your dreams and achieve. That is the main point of branding to start off with, and that is what I believe and that is what I follow. Some men say why? I suggest you say why not! The idea must come from you deep within you. Don’t be a copyright, have your own idea. P.S Banking all you ideas in marketing of your product on the internet will not be a success for you. You have to have a full marketing scheme. People use the internet now because it is cheap and free. It is good to have a presence on the internet but you will not get a whole or full marketing value for your product.

JosephKellner.com

If you have something you love to do. Do it. If there is something you would love to do. Do it!

Real Hair Truth Cosmetic/Beauty Product Injury Lawsuits

the real hair truth

Injuries from cosmetic products can come in a wide variety of forms — from allergic reactions to infections and other complications. There are two main legal theories that a person injured by a cosmetic product (the plaintiff) could sue under: product liability and breach of warranty. This article discusses what a plaintiff in a cosmetic injury suit must prove under either theory, cases specifically related to allergic reactions, and the possibility of class action lawsuits.

Product Liability: The Basics

The most likely theory to be used in a lawsuit involving cosmetic product injuries is product liability. An injured plaintiff can sue both the manufacturer and/or the seller (the defendant) of the cosmetic product if his or her injury was caused by a defect, a defective design or improper labeling. Most states follow what is called the “strict product liability” rule, although a few still use traditional negligence rules.

A plaintiff suing under a strict liability theory simply needs to prove:

  • that he or she was the kind of consumer that the defendant intended to use the product
  • that the defect did not occur after the product was sold, and
  • that the plaintiff was injured.

This kind of theory is called “strict liability” because many of the requirements in a standard negligence case, like proof of a specific duty of care owed to the plaintiff, are not included. Most states adopted strict liability for mass-marketed consumer products because, among other things, the manufacturers needed to be financially responsible for their products, and not be allowed to escape liability simply because of the difficulty plaintiffs faced trying to prove negligence claims.

In a negligence case (in those few states that still use this theory for consumer products), the plaintiff will need to prove:

  • that he or she bought the product from the defendant
  • that the defendant should have known that the product could be dangerous if unaccompanied by proper warnings, or that the product had a defect
  • that the failure to warn the plaintiff, or the defect or defective design, injured the plaintiff, and
  • that the plaintiff didn’t do anything to cause the injury.

Breach of Warranty

A cosmetic product injury case based on a breach of warranty theory will be the same as other standard breach of warranty cases.

An injured plaintiff could sue for breach of an express warranty if the seller or manufacturer made specific guarantees that a product would have specific effects that the product did not have (note that this theory might not fit with most cases involving an actual injury).

The plaintiff could also sue for breach of an implied warranty that the cosmetic product was fit for normal use, i.e. the implied guarantee that no normal cosmetic product would cause an injury if used properly.

Finally, the plaintiff could sue for breach of an implied warranty that the product was fit for a specific purpose, i.e. that the defendant knew the plaintiff wanted to use the product for a specific purpose, but the product caused an injury when the plaintiff tried use it.

There are many state and federal laws controlling breach of warranty claims. Some breach of warranty claims may not be appropriate when the plaintiff is suing for physical injuries, if the law only allows compensation for the money lost on the product (what is called “economic damages”).

Some warranty laws, however, do allow a plaintiff to sue for physical injuries. Perhaps more importantly, proving a breach of warranty can help prove a strict liability or negligence claim. A plaintiff is not limited to suing under one theory, so including a breach of warranty claim in a cosmetic injury lawsuit will generally help a plaintiff’s case overall.

Injuries Caused by Allergies

If a manufacturer knows, or should know, that a product might cause an allergic reaction in some people, injured plaintiffs could potentially sue the manufacturer for failing to warn about the allergic reaction under a strict liability or negligence theory. A breach of warranty theory might also be possible if the allergic reaction is not extremely rare, i.e. the product was not fit for cosmetic use because some percentage of the population was allergic.

Class Actions for Cosmetic Product Injuries

If a cosmetic product causes many or all of its users the same kind of injury, then a class action may be possible. In a class action case, multiple plaintiffs with the same kind of injury from the same source sue the defendant in one lawsuit.

If someone is injured by a cosmetic product, they or their attorney should research whether there is already a class action case or a settlement fund for people injured by the product. Often, even though the case has settled, there will be a fund to pay those who were not a part of the original case.

Real Hair Truth what makes a cosmetic misbranded?

The Beautiful Lies

The film “Beautiful Lies” release date will be in 2014

In our beautiful world cosmetics hold a strong life in the world of personnel beauty. According to the U.S Government this is a definition of what is “Misbranded”.  Realize my friends that in this day and age government is in everything you do, and with the past and current behavior of the U.S Government would you even take there word on just about anything. Politicians cannot even agree on anything anymore, there life span as a senator, congressman, house representative is for life. Your freedom of speech is going down the drain. So why would you take the word of the FDA. According to the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA), its responsibilities include “protecting the public health by assuring that foods, cosmetics are safe, wholesome, sanitary and properly labeled.” This responsibility entails regulating a large number of companies producing this nation’s food, making appointments to the high-level positions within the agency very important.  Most high-level FDA employees have a background in either medicine or law, but one of the largest private-sector sources is the Monsanto Company. Over the past decades, at least seven high-ranking employees in the FDA have an employment history with the Monsanto Company.

Well aware of its accused ‘revolving door’ connection with the FDA and other government agencies, Monsanto has issued several press releases denying collusion with the government. In fact, it posted on its official website that collusion theories relating to these agencies, including the FDA, “ignore the simple truth that people regularly change jobs to find positions that match their experience, skills and interests.  ”

Monsanto’s statements help shed light on the balancing act regularly occurring on Capitol Hill when appointments to these top agency positions arise. The importance of the food, cosmetic industrys cannot be overstated and, therefore, the pending question remains: Do Americans want industry insiders regulating it, or those from the academic realm?

What makes a cosmetic misbranded?

Section 602 of the FD&C Act [21 U.S.C. 362] describes what causes a cosmetic to be considered misbranded:

“A cosmetic shall be deemed to be misbranded–

  • (a) If its labeling is false or misleading in any particular.
  • (b) If in package form unless it bears a label containing (1) the name and place of business of the manufacturer, packer, or distributor; and (2) an accurate statement of the quantity of the contents in terms of weight, measure, or numerical count: Provided, That under clause (2) of this paragraph reasonable variations shall be permitted, and exemptions as to small packages shall be established, by regulations prescribed by the Secretary.
  • (c) If any word, statement, or other information required by or under authority of this Act to appear on the label or labeling is not prominently placed thereon with such conspicuousness (as compared with other words, statements, designs, or devices in the labeling) and in such terms as to render it likely to be read and understood by the ordinary individual under customary conditions of purchase and use.
  • (d) If its container is so made, formed, or filled as to be misleading.
  • (e) If it is a color additive, unless its packaging and labeling are in conformity with such packaging and labeling requirements, applicable to such color additive, as may be contained in regulations issued under section 721. This paragraph shall not apply to packages of color additives which, with respect to their use for cosmetics, are marketed and intended for use only in or on hair dyes (as defined in the last sentence of section 601(a)).
  • (f) If its packaging or labeling is in violation of an applicable regulation issued pursuant to section 3 or 4 of the Poison Prevention Packaging Act of 1970.

Note that under the FD&C Act, the term “misbranding” applies to–

  • False or misleading information,*
  • Lack of required information,
  • Conspicuousness and readability of required information,
  • Misleading packaging,
  • Improper packaging and labeling of color additives, and
  • Deficiencies where the Poison Prevention Packaging Act requires special packaging.

*Note: According to the FD&C Act, a determination that labeling is “misleading” includes considering both what the label says and what it fails to reveal:

“If an article is alleged to be misbranded because the labeling or advertising is misleading, then in determining whether the labeling or advertising is misleading there shall be taken into account (among other things) not only representations made or suggested by statement, word, design, device, or any combination thereof, but also the extent to which the labeling or advertising fails to reveal facts material in the light of such representations or material with respect to consequences which may result from the use of the article to which the labeling or advertising relates under the conditions of use prescribed in the labeling or advertising thereof or under such conditions of use as are customary or usual” (FD&C Act, sec. 201(n); 21 U.S.C. 321(n)].

In addition, a cosmetic marketed in violation of the FPLA or any regulations issued under its authority is considered misbranded within the meaning of the FD&C Act [15 U.S.C.1456(a)]. For cosmetics offered for sale as consumer commodities, the FPLA–

  • requires further label information, such as the product’s identity [15 U.S.C.1453], and
  • authorizes the implementation of regulations to specify the proper presentation of required label information, require an ingredient declaration, and prevent deceptive packaging [15 U.S.C.1454 (c)]

The FPLA defines a consumer commodity, as it applies to FDA-regulated products, as:

“any food, drug, device, or cosmetic (as those terms are defined by the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act …, and any other article, product, or commodity of any kind or class which is customarily produced or distributed for sale through retail sales agencies or instrumentalities for consumption by individuals, or use by individuals for purposes of personal care or in the performance of services ordinarily rendered within the household, and which usually is consumed or expended in the course of such consumption or use.” [15 U.S.C.1459(a)]

Note that the FPLA defines a consumer commodity by the way it is marketed, not the way it is labeled. Labeling a product with words such as “For Professional Use Only” does not keep your product from being considered a consumer commodity under the FPLA.

Labeling regulations are very complex. Detailed information on cosmetic labeling is available in FDA’s Cosmetic Labeling Manual and the labeling regulations themselves [21 CFR 701].

2013 In Review For the Real Hair Truth Organization/Jotovi Designs Inc

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The blog (The Real Hair Truth)/organization (Jotovi Designs) did well this past year.  The “TRUTHFUL”  voice for the industry will always be here on this page. The truth of the industry will always be written and told by me. Even though you will not find it in Modern Salon, PBA, Salon Galaxy,  Hairbrained.me, ETC.  And my films will voice the truth of the industry, ‘The Real Hair Truth, The Beautiful Lies”. Thank you everyone for your support the last 7 years. We have did it on our own without the help of industry magazines, websites, or cosmetic brands.

Jotovi Designs Inc.

We have funded our books and films on our own and will continue to do so.  Jotovi Designs Inc. is not looking for any help financially from any beauty/cosmetic industry brands and will continue to do so!  The organization continues to help professionals in the industry and will continue to do so! This year will be the release of the second documentary called “Beautiful Lies”.  I thank everyone for their continued support and may all have a wonderful New Year!

Best Regards

Joseph Kellner

Here’s an excerpt:

The concert hall at the Sydney Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 19,000 times in 2013. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 7 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

L’Oréal Hair Product Class Action Lawsuit Settlement. Burn In Hell!!

TheRealHairTruthLogo

As usual in our industry, See no Evil, Hear no Evil, Speak no Evil. None of the So-called industry websites, comic books, or fan clubs will do no reporting against no major manufacturer in my industry. It is common knowledge for manufacturers to supply the latest and greatest to the industry sheep. For the purpose of increasing the financial pyramid for themselves. No longer is there a honest approach of informing the beauty industry of news about class action lawsuits for the betterment of the industry. WHY YOU SAY? Because industry giants sustain the beauty industry and give financial backing to the comic books, websites and fan clubs. If one of the three prior mentioned “bite” the hand that feeds them there would be no existence for that website, or magazine or organization.  So in general you will not know who, what, where in this industry. You will be led unless you do any investigative work by yourselves.

REALHAIRTRUTH

L’Oréal USA Inc. has reached a class action lawsuit settlement over claims it falsely marketed shampoo, condition and styling products under the Matrix, Kérastase, Redken and Pureology brand names.Under the proposed settlement agreement, L’Oréal will modify the labels of these products to remove certain misleading language.

The L’Oréal settlement will resolve a class action lawsuit (Richardson v. L’Oréal USA Inc.) that alleges L’Oréal misled consumers into believing they could only purchase the Matrix, Kérastase, Redken and Pureology products exclusively in professional salons, when consumers can purchase the products in major retail outlets.

REAlhairtruth.com

L’Oréal denies any wrongdoing, but has agreed to a class action lawsuit settlement to resolve the litigation.

Class Members of the L’Oréal class action settlement include all consumers nationwide who purchased the L’Oréal products for personal, family or household use on or after August 30, 2008. There is no monetary benefit for Class Members. Instead, L’Oréal has agreed to remove from the labeling of these hair products the following “claims”:

  • “for sale only in professional beauty salons”;
  • “exclusive salon distribution”;
  • “exclusive to Kérastase consultant salons”;
  • “only professional”;
  • “only in salon”;
  • “sold exclusively in salons”;
  • “available only at fine salons and spas”;
  • “available only at fine salons”; and
  • similar claims in English or other languages which may be read as suggesting availability for purchase exclusively in professional salons.

Since there is no monetary benefit for Class Members, there is no claim filing deadline. If you wish to object to the L’Oréal product class action settlement, you must do so by September 11, 2013.

Will the industry inform you about this?

NO THEY WONT, MY FRIENDS.

THEY WILL NOT!

Because the industry is L’oreal, And they do not want you to know any wrong about these companies. God Forbid they would reach out to you and explain the particulars of this lawsuit and tell you how to apply for claims.

For the entrepreneur the beauty industry is good news!

THE REAL HAIR TRUTH

Beauty Industry in 2013 at a Glance

Comprised of a diverse yet interrelated set of business lines, the beauty industry helps us look and smell our best. Before we leave the house each day, we have likely undergone our personalized beautification ritual. Included in this ritual is the daily shower and shave, the weekly nail trim, and the monthly haircut. And increasingly we are taking a more holistic view of our health, and our beautification ritual may now include a periodic massage and trip to the spa. But our concern with our appearance is hardly anything new; indeed the beauty industry has been expanding and growing for all of recorded history. For the interested entrepreneur this continuing growth and evolution offers a diverse menu of opportunity.

The beauty industry today encompasses far more than cosmetics and skin care products, though they are still a significant portion of the sector. A wide range of services and products are available to help us put our best face forward, and the beauty industry now also encompasses hair styling and hair removal, nail and tanning salons,massage parlors, shower and shaving products, perfumes, colognes and more. Many people now treat their beauty ritual as an escape from the hustle of the information age, whether its a few minutes spoiling oneself with a high-end product or a full day at a luxury spa.

Lotions, Treatments and Baths. Oh my!

Beauty industry opportunities can be broadly separated between products and services, though many providers offer both. Within both products and services, however, exist a wide range of business models based on target market, production processes and location.

From exfoliating soaps and volumizing shampoos to anti-wrinkle creams, the beauty industry provides us with choices galore to keep us looking younger and healthier. Cosmetics exist for every style and taste, as well as every skin tone, texture and even allergy. Rows of toothpaste stretch off into the distance at the local retail outlet, and it is no longer a choice only of brand, but between whitening, tartar protection, flavor, packaging styles and more! And a similar story is told in the aisles for perfume, deodorant and hair coloring. Certain businesses also distinguish themselves through manufacturing processes such as using all natural ingredients or a refusal to use animal testing on products.

While the diversity among service providers is not quite as extensive, there is considerable differentiation between offerings based on price, location and target markets. Some businesses target the inexpensive, fast hair cut market while others focus on providing a luxury spa experience. Franchise opportunities exist for hair salons, skin treatments, nail care, and tanning. Niche providers offer products and services focused on children, weddings,  and fashion, among others.

Different Beauty Franchise Opportunities

Hair Care Stylists, salons, shampoos/conditioners, coloring product, styling product (gels, sprays, etc)
Cosmetics & Skin care Make-up, moisturizing lotions, tanning salons, sun care products
Fragrance Perfumes, body sprays, cologne, deodorants
Miscellaneous Nail polish, shaving products, massage parlors, hair removal services

Beauty Industry Trends

Such diversity and innovation exists because we demand it. The beauty industry continues to expand globally, with some projections claiming 8.5% growth by 2014; revenue growth in 2010 is estimated at 3.3%. Several trends support this expansion and promise continued profitability into the future.

Globally, rising per capita incomes and greater access to international markets are increasing spending on discretionary items such as perfumes and cosmetics. Though the recent economic turmoil had decreased spending on some discretionary products in the United States, purchasing of beauty products has remained strong. Consumers did tend to be more price-conscious however, with over 70% of survey respondents claiming to give mass market products more consideration over high-end products during the downturn.

Perhaps not as surprising as it once was, one of the fastest growing segments of the beauty industry is products and services aimed at men. Traditionally focused on female consumers, men today are gaining increasing attention from the beauty industry. Of course most of us have been using deodorant and toothpaste for several months already, but increasingly men are being targeted for body sprays, specialty hair products, lotions and even nail care. Salons offer a menu of pampering services for men, including cuts and shaves, facials, massages and manicures.

Consumers of beauty industry products tend to be brand loyal, and share what works for them with their friends. 58% of those surveyed claimed that personal recommendations weigh more heavily than celebrity marketing, and only 44% bought a particular product for its claim of specific product attributes. Like many things, beauty products gain a level of familiarity and comfort for the consumer, and switching to a new product often takes some extra incentive. Popular and successful marketing campaigns in the beauty industry often include a free sample and discounts for referrals to lure new customers in, and loyalty programs to keep them.

Beauty Industry Franchise Opportunities

From product innovation, organic industry growth and continued growth into the male half of the population, the beauty industry continues to offer a diverse set of profitable franchising opportunities. Beauty franchises exist across the space with dozens of strategies reaching all types of consumer.

Retail opportunities include brick-and-mortar store locations as well as home-based businesses, and span across cosmetics, skin care, hair care, tanning and more. Frequently producers of beauty industry products will have a franchising distribution system, or even have training locations for service providers. Cosmetic and skin care entrepreneurs offer specialized services such as nail care and tanning, a complete menu designed for the full day experience and everything in between. Some salons offer an exclusive membership experience and others specialize on walk-in business.

Hair care opportunities exist for barbers and stylists alike, with a range of different franchises available based on cost, location, and gender. Many male-focused franchises offering everything from the basic barbershop have been springing up to complement the traditionally female-focused salon offerings. Franchise chains devoted to children offer a more entertaining environment for kids. There are also businesses focused on hair removal and coloring.

splish-franchise-opportunities

Eco-friendly salons such as the Splish franchise offer hair care in an environmentally conscious environment.

As we can see, the beauty industry encompasses a wide range of products and services, and franchising plays a major part in bringing them to the consumer. As the industry continues to grow and evolve, profitable opportunities will abound…the hard part is choosing which one!