Tag: color

THE SMARTPHONE OF HAIRCOLOR IS HERE….COURTESY OF B’ORÉAL OF PARIS.

THE REAL HAIR TRUTH.COM

I often wonder why salon owners and booth renters will buy from B’Oreal, WHY? But as soon as I think about it hairdressers are not left brain and right brained at the same time. Business is not taught in beauty schools. And if there is a business class in the hair shows it is to dump on one brand and try to sell you there’s.

So who do you want to partner with, the company that teaches consumers that they can do your job & discredits you or the ones that support the professional hairdresser? And the professional(?) Hairdresser will buy from companies such as Boreal, Paul Mitchell, Redken, TIGI, etc. knowing they do not have a EXCLUSIVE with the company. Because they are in competition with the manufacturer. The manufacturer will make a cosmetic line for the consumer and also for the professional(?). Trust me in other professions a true professional would not do this stupid mistake.
THE SMARTPHONE OF HAIRCOLOR IS HERE….COURTESY OF B’ORÉAL of PARIS.
L’Oreal Paris Mousse Absolue
At-home hair dye always seems like a fine idea until you find yourself trying to mix several different foul-smelling chemicals in the right ratio while unfolding a manual the size of a roadmap for planet Earth. But, though it may be less than ideal, for many women, an expensive hours-long trip to the salon isn’t an option anymore.
It’s something that’s been in the works for over a decade, according to Luc Maelstaf, packaging designer for B’Oreal of Paris. “Everybody always dreams of a product where you push a button and a machine does the work for you,” he says. “This device does just that: It makes the hair color mix without the consumer even noticing that it’s happening.”

Maelstaf says that B’Oreal of Paris used Japanese technology to develop the packaging of the product, which is what makes the automatic, reusable qualities possible. Two separate aerosol cans are held together in a sleek plastic sleeve. One can contains the colorant; the other, the oxidant. “The reaction to create hair color only happens when you have a mix of those two things,” says Sophie Bodelin, the head of hair color labs for the France headquarters of B’Oréal of Paris. “But now you don’t have to mix it yourself. The mix is complete as soon as the product comes out of the bottle.”

But in my industry they will buy the products from Boreal and use them in there salon. And what you have to listen to now is when the customer asks you what are you using on there hair. They will ask you. And then go home and find it on the internet. Thank you internet you gave the manufacturers a ndew3 way to sell there products. And that goes like wise for the entrepreneur. A entrepreneur will have a lot of hard times in the beauty industry. Manufacturing a beauty product is not easy and it takes money from start to finish to packing. What’s left for the beauty industry entrepreneur. The internet. Cosmetics company’s have never dreamed there sales would sky rocket like they have since the birth of the internet.
So for the Entrepreneur. 
 IT’S SIMPLE AND THEY HAVE SEEN THE MAJOR MANUFACTURERS DO IT SO THEY ARE ALREADY SCHOOLED on the vast uses of the internet. And also IN THE KNOWLEDGE OF NO VALUE AND NO EXCLUSIVE FOR THERE FELLOWS IN THE INDUSTRY. That would be too much to ask for especially in day and age when EX-Monsanto employee’s run the FDA.  Why go door to door anymore to sell your product. Don’t put a face on it, don’t take any responsibility for it. When you can just plant your packaged (Soap) on the internet. And dear Lord don’t get to know your customers, because they will soon find out your product is just a private label just like the many entrepreneurs have in the beauty industry. I have a gentleman in my next film “The Beautiful Lies” who sells hair color. Since I have used his hair color I get nothing but calls from the company wanting to tell me of there newest and latest and greatest product. That I should try and mind you buy also. They never heard of having samples to give to there good clients. And if a company in my so called professional beauty industry wants to tell you the horrors of a major manufacturer it is for there goodness. They just want you to buy there shit.
LOSERS!

 

You Should know FDA Authority Over Beauty/Cosmetics

 
Sorry everyone I’m not selling hair care, or teaching haircuts, or color but what I can give you is information that you should know. I have been in the Beauty/Cosmetic industry for well over 25 years and take it from me, a product is here yesterday and gone tomorrow. In Cosmetology school there is a lack of education being given to the student on laws of products, what a manufacturer can say and not say ie (labeling, ingredient’s). What governmental agency’s are there for the protection of the independent stylist and also for the salon employee. Many, many individuals will set up blogs, websites telling you how to overcome customer relations, how to hair color, how to haircutting, and often these individuals will set up a class telling you how to make a ‘Facebook page”. I see this alot at the beauty shows in my industry. But I never really see the hard facts being given to the professional. Its easy to skirt the issues of the beauty industry, “Keep the dumb”, I say. Which to me is so very sad. Many of my fellow professionals are given a line of BS, and are insulted by manufacturers and so-called beauty icons and magazine and websites. Not really taking the issues that are needed for change in my industry, Product knowledge is what they will get and only enough education to buy a product the manufacturers are pushing. Below is important information you should know about the FDA, and how it will help you within your profession. Never, never take the sales persons,distributors or manufactures word as law in the beauty/cosmetic industry, investigate on your own and come to your on conclusions. And if you see a so-called beauty industry “ICON’ pushing a product, WATCHOUT, they are basically being paid to SELL that product!
What does the law say about cosmetic safety and labeling?
The two most important laws pertaining to cosmetics marketed in the United States are the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act1 (FD&C Act) and the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act2 (FPLA). The Food, Drug & Cosmetic Act prohibits the marketing of adulterated or misbranded cosmetics in interstate commerce. Violations of the Act involving product composition–whether they result from ingredients, contaminants, processing, packaging, or shipping and handling–cause cosmetics to be adulterated and subject to regulatory action.
 
Under the FD&C Act, a cosmetic is adulterated if–
“it bears or contains any poisonous or deleterious substance which may render it injurious to users under the conditions of use prescribed in the labeling thereof, or under conditions of use as are customary and usual” [with an exception made for hair dyes];
“it consists in whole or in part of any filthy putrid, or decomposed substance”;
“it has been prepared, packed, or held under insanitary conditions whereby it may have become contaminated with filth, or whereby it may have been rendered injurious to health”;
“its container is composed, in whole or in part, of any poisonous or deleterious substance which may render the contents injurious to health”; or except for hair dyes, “it is, or it bears or contains, a color additive4 which is unsafe within the meaning of section 721(a)” of the FD&C Act. (FD&C Act, sec. 601).
 
Improperly labeled or deceptively packaged products are considered misbranded and subject to regulatory action. Under the FD&C Act, a cosmetic is considered misbranded if–
“its labeling is false or misleading in any particular”;
“its label does not include all required information;
“the required information is not adequately prominent and conspicuous;
“its container is so made, formed, or filled as to be misleading”;
“it is a color additive, other than a hair dye, that does not conform to applicable regulations issued under section 721 of the FD&C Act; and
“its packaging or labeling is in violation of an applicable regulation issued pursuant to section 3 or 4 of the Poison Prevention Packaging Act of 1970.” (FD&C Act, sec. 602)
In addition, under the authority of the FPLA, FDA requires an ingredient declaration to enable consumers to make informed purchasing decisions. Cosmetics that fail to comply with the FPLA are considered misbranded under the FD&C Act. It is important to understand that Congress passes the laws that govern the United States. To put those laws into effect, Congress authorizes certain government agencies, including FDA, to create and enforce regulations, but only as authorized under the law. A change in FDA’s statutory authority over cosmetics would require Congress to change the law.
Does FDA approve cosmetics before they go on the market?
FDA’s legal authority over cosmetics is different from other products regulated by the agency, such as drugs, biologic, and medical devices. Cosmetic products and ingredients are not subject to FDA premarket approval authority, with the exception of color additives. However, FDA may pursue enforcement action against violative products, or against firms or individuals who violate the law.
Must cosmetic manufacturers register with FDA?
Manufacturers are not required to register their cosmetic establishments, file data on ingredients, or report cosmetic-related injuries to FDA. However, companies are encouraged to register their establishments and file Cosmetic Product Ingredient Statements with FDA’s Voluntary Cosmetic Registration Program11 (VCRP).
Can FDA inspect cosmetic manufacturers?
FDA can and does inspect cosmetic manufacturing facilities10 to assure cosmetic product safety and determine whether cosmetics are adulterated or misbranded under the FD&C Act or FPLA.
What actions can FDA take against firms that market adulterated or misbranded cosmetics?
FDA may take regulatory action if it has information to support that a cosmetic is adulterated or misbranded. The agency can pursue action through the Department of Justice in the federal court system to remove adulterated and misbranded cosmetics from the market. To prevent further shipment of an adulterated or misbranded product, the agency may request a federal district court to issue a restraining order against the manufacturer or distributor of the violative cosmetic. Violative cosmetics may be subject to seizure. FDA also may initiate criminal action against a person violating the law. In addition, FDA works closely with the U.S. Customs and Border Protection8 to monitor imports. Under section 801(a) of the FD&C Act, imported cosmetics9 are subject to review by FDA at the time of entry through U.S. Customs. Products that do not comply with FDA laws and regulations are subject to refusal of admission into the United States. Violative products must be brought into compliance (if feasible), destroyed, or re-exported. FDA takes regulatory action based upon agency priorities, consistent with public health concerns and available resources.
 
Can FDA order the recall of a hazardous cosmetic from the market?
Recalls of cosmetics are voluntary actions taken by manufacturers or distributors to remove from the marketplace products that represent a hazard or gross deception, or that are somehow defective. FDA categorizes a firms action as a recall (as opposed to a market withdrawal) when it determines that the product hazard or defect represents a violation of the FD&C Act. FDA is not authorized to require recalls of cosmetics but does monitor companies that conduct a product recall and may request a product recall if the firm is not willing to remove dangerous products from the market without FDA’s written request. Recalls are addressed in Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), sections 7.40 through 7.59.
Who is responsible for substantiating the safety of cosmetics?
Cosmetic firms are responsible for substantiating the safety of their products and ingredients before marketing. Failure to adequately substantiate the safety of a cosmetic product or its ingredients prior to marketing causes the product to be misbranded unless the following warning statement appears conspicuously on the principal display panel of the product’s label:
“Warning–The safety of this product has not been determined.” (21 CFR 740.10)
In addition, regulations prohibit or restrict the use of several ingredients5 in cosmetic products and require warning statements6 on the labels of certain types of cosmetics. In general, except for color additives and those ingredients which are prohibited or restricted from use in cosmetics by regulation, a manufacturer may use any ingredient in the formulation of a cosmetic provided that the ingredient and the finished cosmetic are safe, the product is properly , and the use of the ingredients does not otherwise cause the cosmetic to be adulterated or  under the laws that FDA enforces.
 
Joseph Kellner Hairdresser/Mua/Film Producer

Shelley Van Pelt Interviewed For The Real Hair Truth

After entering cosmetology school at the young age of 15, Shelly Van Pelt knew hair was her business. Through a co-op program with her high school in Ann Arbor Michigan, she completed 1500 hours and went straight to work refining her cutting skills at Master Cuts. After 4 years, she decided it was time to move on. Wanting to study color and extensions, she found the Queen of Color and King of Extensions,Jesse and Flo Briggs at the Yellow Strawberry in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Now at the Yellow Strawberry for 5 years, Shelly has appeared in New York Times, Chicago Tribune, Sun Sentinel, Gold Coast Magazine, Modern Salon Magazine, and Hairs How. Side by side with Jesse and Flo she helped create the S Wave Thermal Set and the Caribbean Dream Relaxer which has taken her to the stage of every major show in the country teaching new retexturizing and finishing techniques. She has done multiple videos, photo shoots, fashions shows, editorials, and even judged hair contests. At the end of the day, Shelly Van Pelt says ” Bring it on!”  It was a joy interviewing this Professional, and also feel the passion, determination, and drive that she has!

David Velasco Donor For The REAL HAIR TRUTH.COM

 David Velasco

With over 30 years Experience in the field of hairdressing, Velasco has become one of the industry’s leading authorities. 

Velasco began his career at the young age of 16 in Tampa.Fla. he soon moved to London, England were he worked and studied his craft with world renown hairdressers of that era.

Upon return to the USA Velasco began to develop his skills as an Educator and Effective Communicator while working with John & Suzzane Chadwick at the “Hair Fashion Development Center” on New York’s 5th Ave.

By the age of 21 Velasco was STYLES DIRECTOR for the SAKS FIFTH AVE. beauty salon in New York City. Over the next 20 years Velasco became involved in almost every aspect of hair related activities possible. Including such achievements as, Freelance Hair Designer for photo sessions with major beauty publications and television commercials. He has held such prestige positions as Educational and Creative Consultant to CLAIROL INC., SHISEIDO LTD.,& THE WELLA CORP..

He has preformed as the Featured Guest Artist and Master Educator at hundreds of trade events throughout the world. His presentation at the 1993 HAIRCOLOR U.S.A., symposium was rated BEST EDUCATIONAL EVENT by his peers.

Velasco has been a Contributing Author to many hair related articles for both consumer and professional publications and books. Velasco held a position as the NATIONAL ARTISTIC DIRECTOR FOR THE WELLA CORP. for ten years and is a member of the INTERNATIONAL HAIRCOLOR EXCHANGE. 

Velasco was formally the DIRECTOR OF HAIRCOLOR for the world renown BUMBLE & BUMBLE SALON in NEW YORK CITY and presently resides over his own salon David Velasco Salon, LTD. in Doylestown, Pennsylvania. David and his Salon are proud members of INTERCOIFFURE MONDIAL, which is the most prestigious international hairdressing organization in the world. 

David currently teaches a two-day hair color seminar called “Color Clusters” with his dear friend and colleague Dee Levin and is also in the process of launching a new company called “Salon Success Systems” and a “Mini Book Series”  aimed at hairdressers and salon owners who want to achieve success in the salon industry

DAVID VELASCO SALON

HAIRCOLOR CLUBHOUSE

Shop Around When Going To Hairdressing School

If there is one element of the human appearance that most stands out, it’s the hair. Just think about how often you’ve heard someone describe a person by their hair color or style – it’s a common occurrence. Many people find that they have a knack for styling hair. Maybe they’ve experimented by cutting a friend’s or their child’s, and now want to turn it into a career. While part of hairdressing is talent, it takes proper hair design training to really become a proper hair stylist. I feel that schools should have a mandatory of 2500 hours in a nationwide curriculum course. State’s require to little time to be spent in school. And off they go! Take an exam and you have a license.

By attending a Cosmetology course you’ll learn the finer points of styling hair. This includes learning the current and ongoing popular trends, as well as the timeless elements of form that go into every good style. Students of hair design will also learn about proper health and maintenance of hair, which is vital to maintaining a good style. Some schools will also encourage their students to embrace their creativity and try to develop their own styles that will really wow their future clients. Schools often teach out of manuals that are not current, and the course’s should be current. When taking the exam there should be a written test but also a practical. I also feel that the License should not be given until the student completes an apprenticeship of a mandatory of one year. Then I feel the license should be given to the student.

Hair design courses vary wildly in terms of cost and how difficult they are to get admitted to. For a long time, people viewed hairdressing schools as the places that people went when they couldn’t cut it in a real college. However, it is increasingly become a more legitimate choice to enroll in cosmetology programs and learn hair design and other beauty enhancing skills. Along with that shift, many new hair design training schools have arisen. Some of these schools are highly exclusive and very expensive. Watch out for all the Private Colleges, Career Training Institutes, Vocational Schools also.

However, there are still many government sponsored programs that are designed to be inexpensive, quick and rudimentary introductions to the world of hairdressing. These programs provide students without training and knowledge to pass a certification test in their state, but little else. Those who dream of hairdressers who are known across the world – or at least in their local communities – are more likely to get the training they need at a private hair design school. Costs for the more exclusive schools can rival the costs of prominent four-year universities, while the prices for the smaller programs can be much cheaper than even community colleges.

For many people, hair design is a form of art. It be discouraging to an up-and-coming hair stylist when they discover that the hair design school they want to attend is out of the price range. Fortunately, there are many options available to help students pay their way through hair design courses. Government grants.
For a good Cosmetology Course I highly recommend TONI&GUY, VIDAL SASSOONS! EXCELLENT SCHOOLS!
Joseph Kellner