Tag: clairol

7 Ways The Beauty Industry Convinced Women That They Weren’t Good Enough

Jotovi Designs Inc

In America, the perennial quest for beauty is an expensive one.

Every year, women spend billions of dollars in exchange for beautiful hair, lovely lashes, and smooth and silky skin. Still, many of our culture’s most common beauty procedures were virtually nonexistent a century ago. The truth is, many of our expectations of feminine beauty were shaped in large part by modern advertisers. We’ve tracked the history behind some of the most common “flaws” that besiege the modern woman and the surprising stories behind their “cures.”

1. “Your natural hair color isn’t pretty enough.”

“Does she or doesn’t she?” asked the Clairol’s ad that launched a million home hair dye jobs. Indeed, the aggressive Clairol Marketing would trigger an explosion in sales. In the process, the percentage of women dyeing their hair would skyrocket from 7 percent to more than 40 percent in the ’70s.

The ads showed everyday women reaping the benefits of more lustrous hair, a luxury that had long been exclusive to glamorous supermodels with professional dye jobs. The ads proclaimed, “If I have only one life, let me live it as a blonde.” Indeed, Clairol peddled the perfect yellow shade of the dye as a way to transform your life:

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Clairol hair dye offered self reinvention, in 20 minutes flat, particularly for women who didn’t want to reveal their true age or grey roots.

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Shirley Polykoff, the advertising writer behind Clairol’s goldmine campaign, described her plan as such: “For big success, we’d have to expand the market to gather in all those ladies who had become stoically resigned to [their gray hair]. This could only be accomplished by reawakening whatever dissatisfaction’s they may have had when they first spotted it.” Clairol did that with ads like, “How long has it been since your husband asked you out to dinner?” Nowadays, about 90 million women in the U.S. color their hair.

 

Coty Will Acquire Procter & Gamble’s Beauty Brands

The Real Hair Truth

Coty Will Acquire Procter & Gamble’s Beauty Brands

Procter & Gamble has been looking to streamline its massive portfolio of brands, looking to sell, spin off, or shut down the majority of them. Last night, the unofficial news came out that many of the company’s beauty brands sold to competitor Coty, which means that Cover Girl and Clairol will be run by another drugstore cosmetics veteran.

Coty may not be a name that you recognize, but the cosmetics conglomerate owns a wide variety of brands: they sell branded fragrances for everyone from Beyoncé to Playboy to Vespa (yes, the scooter company). Their best-known brand is probably nail care products sold under the name Sally Hansen (who was not a real person) but they also own higher-prestige brands like OPI (nail care) and Philosophy (skin care).

Coty isn’t in the hair care business, so acquiring hair color brands like Clairol and Wella would introduce them to a new market. They are, however, already selling products to salons: OPI sells nail polishes and supplies to pros as well as directly to consumers.

The Cleveland Plain Dealer estimates that the acquisition would double Coty’s annual sales. The brands included in the deal are Cover Girl, Max Factor (which remains popular in Europe, but is no longer sold here) and the two hair color brands, Clairol and Wella. P&G would hold on to its brands that revolve around soap and shampoo, like Aussie, Old Spice, and Pantene.

There are other bidders in the mix, including private-equity firms and other soap companies, so this deal isn’t finalized yet. Some sources are also reporting that Coty won the bid for Procter & Gamble’s fragrance brands.

Beauty Industry Entrepreneurs, who supports them?

Beautiful Lies

You know what is amazing in my industry you can tell the “sheepple” the truth about their industry but they are still sheep. There are a lot of followers in my industry but the people I highlight in my film are true entrepreneurs. They are trying to make a difference within their profession. The manufacturers, so-called organizations, industry websites and magazines go ahead and advertise the (Icons) of the  beauty industry. Don’t get me wrong I love my craft, but the people they advertise as “Icons” are the ones who are doing the brain washing for the financial pyramid, within my industry. I always tell my friends or they ask me, Why do you make these films? There is no money in it!. Or I love this one, You will never make a name for yourself in this industry. I am not looking to be in an beauty industry magazine or website, etc. I follow my own path. God said to us all, “Follow the path less traveled”. And it is true, you have to be your own man or person in this world. And the main moral or value to this is, “Do what you feel is right”.  I have never been a follower in my life, I have my own business (Salon), and I enjoy writing and making Documentary’s.

I am not the best, but I learn from my prior mistakes and enjoy critics.

In my industry the major manufacturers sell to the commercial sector which is basically the consumer.. There was a time when all good hair care products, hair color, hair color treatments were done in the salon and sold only in the salon. This gave our profession more value more respect. But with the birth of the internet. Beauty manufacturers gave notice and realized that they could also sell their products and hair color to the world with little or no expense. Just build a web page and purchase a domain that has nothing to do with the parent company and sell and give next day delivery to the consumer. Little did they know how bad of a hurting they have done to my beauty industry.  Now in the year 2013 you can buy hair color, treatments and such on the internet. And these are the same products that are used in hair salons all over the United States. Yes even the hair color can be bought on the internet and delivered next day to the consumer. Even the keratin treatments can be bought on the internet. So as time went by little did they know (Major Manufacturers) were putting a hurting on my industry. The economy in the U.S is horrible now and clients will say to you I am living up north for a few months can I get my formula. And the hairdresser will give it to them, only to find out they never see them again. They now have the formula and can do it at home. So many professionals will give the manufacturer their loyalty, and there undivided devotion and purchase hair color, etc. from them.  But at the same time knowing the manufacturers make a hair color for the commercial sector to buy.  L’Oreal, Clairol, you name it. So where is the exclusive from the manufacturer to the salon owner or professional? Why would a salon professional buy from a manufacturer and basically they are competing for business with the manufacturer!

Where is the Manufacturer Loyalty?

There is none. And the sad thing about it is the so-called professionals will back up these manufacturers. They don’t realize that putting up a sign on the salon window from L’Oreal, Paul Mitchell, Clairol, that are giving the company free advertising. And they will carry these lines even though they are sold in the mass market. You are in competition with the manufacturer wake up everyone!

Some industry professionals make their own product lines, books, films, makeup etc. These entrepreneurs feel why not put the money in their own pockets instead of supporting the financial pyramid in the cosmetic industry. But it is hard for them to start-up. In an industry dominated by major manufacturers. The manufacturers can buy the movie stars,  do mass marketing etc. Which takes money, money, money. The entrepreneur will either formulate or private label the product line and then finish it. And hopefully will have the finances placed aside for marketing. A lot of entrepreneurs will do it in there local. Which will save on shipping for them.  Business is Business, I accept that. But in my beauty industry, magazines, websites, hair shows will go to the major manufacturers and have them buy advertising space, booth space at their hair shows at monumental prices. The magazines, websites, hair shows do that and charge them. Knowing they can pay that kind of money. The entrepreneur cannot do that.  And those funds sustain the beauty magazines, websites, hair shows. If they did not charge those fee’s they would not have their websites or magazine. Major manufacturers will also pay the magazines, and websites hair color or products’ in place of cash for their payment. The beauty industry magazine’s and websites will go ahead and sell those products’ online to get their money back for the advertising bought by the manufacturer. Believe in what I say soap in this industry is GOLD. An entrepreneur cannot do that so basically who is giving the small guy in the industry a bone? They learn to network together. They follow like-minded people and they blossom. Believe me not to the extent of the “Big Boys”. Because the major manufacturers will keep an eye on them!

Should we not be advertising the new in my professional or keep up feeding the Major Manufacturers who place chemical that are harmful in out products. They are kings of deceptive marketing. And they know how to stretch the law. No worry’s for them. If they get fined by OSHA, or the FDA. It will not even be penny’s to them.  So where does the little guy come in? They cannot afford the fee’s for advertising in an industry magazine on a consistent basis, hair show fee’s are huge, and industry websites only back the big boys on the beauty/ cosmetic industry. Rolling out a spread in an industry magazine for a few months can be the total amount of finances an entrepreneur has for the year. The entrepreneur is done after that. Time to hit the pavement and go door to door.

It’s all a big money pit for everyone except for the little guy (Entrepreneur) in the beauty industry.  They have to tooth and claw for what little they have in my industry.  God forbid you piss off the Big Boys they will stop financing the magazines and hair shows. Then what will we have, I can tell you a true beauty industry. Forget about it. It’s a money pyramid, not even the beauty industry’s so-called organizations could even have the slightest clue. If you look at the PBA most of the board are from manufacturers.  There too busy buying up hair shows and asking for financial help from the Big Boys so they can sustain themselves. They should teach in beauty school how to be your own man. The  entrepreneurs are scattering for the meager pieces of cheese that drop down from the top. And the sad thing about this is the industry professionals are the sheeple in an industry that rapes them each and everyday! They are mere salesmen and women for the Big Boys.

Ask yourself, “Who really is the ASSHOLE, the Manufacturer, Website or Industry magazine.  Who advertise these Big Boys who are sticking it up your ASS each and everyday.

Or is it the Asshole who makes the films to let you know who really is concerned about you.

So tell me who is really the asshole here.?

God forbid we stand up for the right things in our profession.

Best Regards Joseph Kellner

David Velasco Interviewed For The Real Hair Truth Documentary!

Velasco began his career at the young age of 16 in Tampa.Fla. He soon moved to London, England where he worked and studied his craft with world-renowned hairdressers of that era.

 Upon return to the USA, Velasco began to develop his skills as an educator and effective communicator while working with John & Suzanne Chadwick at the “Hair Fashion Development Center” on New York’s 5th Ave.

 By the age of 21 Velasco was STYLES DIRECTOR for the SAKS FIFTH AVE. beauty salon in New York City. Over the next 20 years, Velasco became involved in almost every aspect of hair related activities possible.

 Including such achievements as, Freelance Hair Designer for photo sessions with major beauty publications and television commercials. He has held such prestige positions as Educational and Creative Consultant to CLAIROL INC., SHISEIDO LTD. and THE WELLA CORP..

 Also, he has preformed as the Featured Guest Artist and Master Educator at hundreds of trade events throughout the world. His presentation at the 1993 HAIRCOLOR U.S.A., symposium was rated BEST EDUCATIONAL EVENT by his peers.

 Velasco has been a Contributing Author to many hair related articles for both consumer and professional publications and books. He has also held a position as the NATIONAL ARTISTIC DIRECTOR FOR THE WELLA CORP. for ten years and is a member of the INTERNATIONAL HAIRCOLOR EXCHANGE.

 Velasco was formerly the DIRECTOR OF HAIRCOLOR for the world renowned BUMBLE & BUMBLE SALON in NEW YORK CITY and presently presides over his own salon, David Velasco Salon, LTD. in Doylestown, Pennsylvania.

DavidVelasco.com

“The Haircolor Expert Networking Clubhouse”

Paul Barry Interviewed For The Real Hair Truth Documentary

 

Paul Barry, president and co-founder of Barristar Productions, became a hairstylist in 1964. 
In 1966 he received his California cosmetology instructors license and also opened his first salon. 

From 1971-1992, Paul owned and operated the largest salon in Orange County. During this time Paul traveled extensively for major product manufacturers including Redken, Clairol and John Paul Mitchell systems.

In 1987, being tired of the travel, Paul. joined by his wife Georgia, co-founded Barristar Productions. Together they have produced numerous trade shows dedicated to the betterment of the cosmetology industry.   Our trade shows are designed for cosmetology students and instructors and are based on education. 

UPCOMING SHOWS

Orlando, Fl – March 14, 2010

Anaheim, Ca – March 28 – 29, 2010

 

Phoenix, Az – April 18 – 19, 2010

 

Minneapolis, Mn – May 2, 2010

Pasadena, Ca – September 26 – 27, 2010

Indianapolis, IN – October 24, 2010

BARRISTAR.COM

P.O. Box 627 • Newport Beach, CA 92661

(949) 673-4245 • 800 SHOW-432 • Fax (949) 673-2542

Barristar.com