Take Action To Clean Up The Beauty Aisle!


Dear friends

When we buy products that we put on our skin, faces and hair, we rightfully expect that they are free of toxic chemicals that increase our risk of breast cancer or  reproductive health problems. But think again.

A recent report card from our partners at Mind the Store shows that retailers Sally Beauty, Ulta Beauty, and Sephora, are failing to address cancer-causing chemicals in the cosmetic and personal care products they sell. Take action to clean up the beauty aisle!

Companies can and should make safer products, sell safer products, and make ingredient transparency a priority. Following pressure from consumers like you, companies like Target, Walmart, CVS Health, and Costco announced policies to get toxic chemicals off their store shelves last year.

Tell these beauty retailers to get their act together!

As more and more families are devastated by a cancer diagnosis, it’s more important than ever to focus on prevention. That’s why we believe – and think you do too – that chemicals that can cause cancer have no place in the products we use to clean and care for our bodies.

Please take action to tell these retailers to stop selling beauty products made with toxic chemicals. Because body care products shouldn’t cost us our health!

Thank you for your own good work on this issue,


Janet Nudelman
Director of Program & Policy, Breast Cancer Prevention Partners
Director, Campaign for Safe Cosmetics 415-321-2902 (direct)

P.S. Donate HERE to support our work to hold beauty retailers and other corporations accountable for product safety and transparency.

MAC In ULTA Shameful. ULTA Is A Flea Market.

MAC Cosmetics is betting that it has found at least a partial solution to the sales slowdown it is suffering as traffic thins out in America’s malls and department stores.  MAC is owned by Estee Lauder by the way and uses the best pigments that can be found in there products. But I would never think of such a wonderful company selling the products to a lower scale conglomerate. But it happens.

The answer as it has been for so many other brands one of the hottest retailers in the U.S. and one that MAC is planning to enter at last, first via the beauty specialty store’s e-commerce platform Ulta.com in May and then via about 25 stores in June. By the end of the year, MAC is expected to be in more than 100 Ulta stores, according to Karen Buglisi Weiler, MAC global brand president. “By mid-June we should have the first one opened,” she said. While MAC is initially going into only a fraction of Ulta stores, the move represents a dramatic departure for the makeup artist brand, which has confined its U.S. distribution mostly to department stores and its international chain of MAC stores, 200 of which are in North America. For example, the brand is not sold in Sephora in the U.S., according to executives.

While MAC is initially going into only a fraction of Ulta stores, the move represents a dramatic departure for the makeup artist brand, which has confined its U.S. distribution mostly to department stores and its international chain of MAC stores, 200 of which are in North America. For example, the brand is not sold in Sephora in the U.S., according to executives. Buglisi Weiler maintains that MAC is shifting in its philosophy from being “a destination brand” with only “one third of the distribution that most of the makeup brands in specialty have. We realize that with the changing behavior you really have be where they want to shop.”

On average, MAC will occupy 200 square feet per store and the product assortment will be limited to 600 stock keeping units, Buglisi Weiler said. While that number is on a par with Ulta’s big makeup brands — Lancôme, Urban Decay and Clinique — it is a smaller total than the roughly 1,200 sku’s MAC has in departments stores and the 1,500 sku’s in its own brand boutiques. Simon said the Ulta curation represents about 45 percent of MAC’s product universe and the individual items were picked in close collaboration between brand and store, playing to MAC’s heritage and Ulta’s penchant for crisp editing. “We worked very closely with Karen and her team to make sure we had the must-haves, the hero products and the pillar categories,” Simon added. “We are deep into foundation, primer and lipstick.”

sad sad sad


Ulta Beauty Starting To Make Headline For The Wrong.

Ulta, Ulta, Ulta. Is in existence because the professionals of the Beauty Industry never took a stand. And a lot of the “Riff Raff”, in the Beauty is because of the complacent professionals.  Worry about there craft and not there industry. Not learning the politics and letting the wolves lead them. That is what happens when you are a sheep and not educated in the Art Of Deceptive Practices.  My Grandfather always said, “Be as sweet as a sheep, But as slick as a snake”. And right he was. The only reason ULTA is in existence is because of US.  No one else, just US. They sell our tools, products, they have a salon who will do work for very cheap cheap. They too away our retail edge and basically all you have is a craft left.

I could go on for hours, and hours and hours. Enlightening you of the “Dark Force”, in our industry. But to no avail the only interest is balayage, ombre etc, etc, etc. So here we go with some news.

A woman who claims she used to work for Ulta Beauty is calling out the chain for unsanitary practices. Twitter user @fatinamxo is using the platform to “warn” other beauty lovers about the safety of their makeup. In a series of tweets, the ex-employee alleged that her managers at the retailer would tell her to “clean” and repackage used items to be sold again. “So I was a former employee at ULTA and whenever a customer would return a product, we were told by managers to repackage/reseal the item and put it back on the shelf,” she wrote on Twitter. “They would resell EVERYTHING. (makeup , hair care , skincare, fragrance ,hair tools, etc.),” she said in a follow-up tweet.

She then posted images of new makeup and makeup she claimed was returned used, repackaged and resold. “For example this foundation (even-sticks) they would clean it with a q-tip to make it look new. I’ll attach a photo of a NEW foundation vs. the one they repackaged and put back on the shelf. ( NOT SANITIZED ),” she captioned the photo.

The Twitter user said her managers would “clean [products] with alcohol” as a way to make them look new.  Her allegations have earned thousands of likes on Twitter, as well as several people coming forward with their own similar stories about Ulta Beauty’s unhygienic practices. “Can 100% confirm this is true. Shopping at any ULTA in Frisco, Mckinney, Denton, Sherman, Allen, basically the entire Dallas area and around they train every single employee to do this. All the stores in the area do this,” one wrote. One ex-employee offered a reason for the “disgusting” action, writing “I worked at Ulta too…and they did that too. They wanted their shrinkage to be low so that’s why but it was so disgusting.” Some Ulta Beauty employees have shared different accounts, stating that their stores never cleaned and resold used make-up. The beauty store released a statement to TODAY regarding the allegations, saying that used products are supposed to be thrown out.

They even put back a USED liquid lipstick, the manager said she would “clean it with alcohol” ( that was the last straw for me ) here is a photo of a lip palette ( exclusive online only ) that was returned and mangers put it back on the shelf to resell (CLEARLY NOT SANITIZED).


“We do not allow the resale of used or damaged products,” an Ulta Beauty spokesperson told TODAY.

Here comes the “BULLSHIT” everyone.

“Our store associates are trained to catalog and then properly dispose of any used or damaged items. If associates have concerns that this or any Ulta Beauty policy is not being followed, they can anonymously report it through our third-party hotline. Our policies, training and procedures are aimed at ensuring that only the highest-quality products are sold in our stores and online. “We take any concern of this nature very seriously and if we find that there is any deviation from our policies, we will take appropriate actions to ensure we continue providing a consistently high-quality product,” the statement continued. “The health and safety of Ulta Beauty guests is a top priority and we strive to deliver an optimal experience every time they shop with us.” The woman said she took to Twitter not because she dislikes Ulta, but wanted to warn others against buying used makeup. Good Job!!!!!!!!!!!!!!





So many people in my beauty industry have so much to say about being a suite or booth renter. To me it give the individual the chance to see if they can make it on there on. When doing commission based employment there is no funds for down time. Such as a hourly wage, you are told to clean, answer phones, stock shelves etc. And do you get paid? NO! So I feel there should be a wage for all cosmetologists in this arena. But as time goes on the same idea of commission still try’s to linger on in the industry. It is a simple way to get free labor from professionals in the industry. With out worrying about compensation to there employee’s. That is changing in California a law is being passed where a hairdresser or nail tech etc. Will have to get the state minimum wage which will be mandatory. I say AMEN to that.

Professionals coming out of school are no longer naive to the old customs of employment.  And I know a few academy’s out there educate there students on “What to look out for”.  Being your own “BOSS” is good for all. Living someones else’s dream and funding there retirement is now for the birds, the industry professionals have “AWOKEN”. Team work is what they will say but basically ‘YOU’, are just making them more profitable. I say take the risk and go for it. Your hard work will pay the bills and make you successful. When you work on commission you have to go to work and worry about how your bills will be paid. And then come to think of it how can you concentrate on what you are doing.  How do I pay my rent, medical, food, car?  Any thoughts?

Time fly’s by and there is change and if you don’t change you will remain stagnate in your life and profession. So many professionals I have worked with have so many talents that I often wonder why they just do hairdressing?  Time will be the ultimate judge for all of us. And we may ask ourselves why do we work for others, why do we live for others dreams? When we all are born with special gifts. Special talents. And in our own rights they are individual.

I have always been a team player and as time has gone by I have learned to look out for what is ‘Best For Me”. Not in a selfish sense but to have new experiences and not play “Follow The Leader”. I have never been such as one, and the only time I was is when I was in Naval Service. So I say to you why don’t you just take a risk, a risk in pushing yourself into a place where you are uncomfortable to learn anew.  They only way of getting enlightenment is going on a path of your own. No one else’s. So moving forward can be scary but learning and doing what you have never done will create a new vision for you. YOU WILL EDUCATE YOURSELF. A Education money cannot buy or a college class that cannot be offered.  I say to you let the past stay there and forge ahead with your dreams, and don’t let a industry say you cant make it. Go for it.

Think about it! You could write a book, make educational video’s, keep people abreast on what is going on with your business, offer class’s, tutor, you could learn to sell your self and not someone’s else’s idea’s.  Follow your own path is the point I am making. Don’t listen to others in your industry. Fear is the main problem with us, a lot of times when I was making my documentary’s, I would think about scripting and continuity, film locations and a timeline. I was scared and had only so much to spend. But taking little bites here and there and surrounding myself with people who new more than me about the ideas, I wanted to do was a very interesting learning process.  So I say to you it’s all about FEAR. That will stop you. Also a big EGO will stop you. Stay with your idea and you will see growth in what your doing and trying to accomplish. Don’t be scared. The funds will also come in time. And the project will let you know when it is finished. NOT YOU.  GO FOR IT MY FRIENDS.

Best Regards

Joseph Kellner


Beauty Business Report 2018 – Cost & Trends

At first blush, the beauty industry could be thought to cater only to the glamorous, or perhaps the vain, or maybe just those in the spotlight. And it does – along with everyone else! The industry is built on the product and services that help us look our best – whatever that best may be. It’s more diverse than you think and it’s certainly not just the makeup, hair color and perfume – it’s also the deodorant, toothpaste and even the ear hair clippers. It’s not just the salons – it’s the barber shops, waxing franchises, massage franchises and a whole lot more. It is every product and service dedicated to helping us look – and smell – the way we want, or the way we believe we should for professional reasons. And our definition of beauty is malleable and ever changing – providing never ending opportunities for the industry to innovate.

Historically trends were driven by celebrity taste-makers through their personal choices or professional endorsements. Those days are gone, or nearly so. 82% of women now believe that social media drives these trends. It’s a constant flow of information and opinion from not just trendsetters or celebrities, but from friends and friends of friends and an entire universe of strangers. But however they are set, there is a large industry ready, willing and able to cater to them. It is resistant to economic downturns and poised for even more growth. For the entrepreneur there are plentiful representative sales opportunities within companies like Avon or Arbonne and many more traditional franchising opportunities providing a slew of services.

As it turns out, it takes a lot of effort to keep us looking and smelling our best – an absolute army of products and services, in fact. Cosmetics, skin care, hair styling, hair coloring, hair removal, nail salons, tanning salons, massage parlors and luxury spas, shower and shaving product, perfumes, colognes…and a whole lot more. And that’s where it starts to get interesting – within each of these segments are products for every different skin tone or texture, allergy, age, hair type or color, sex – even the time of day! It is a level of diversity and nuance that may go unnoticed to the casual observer. Some of us, in fact, are overwhelmed by all those rows of shaving cream. But increasingly we are the minority – most consumers care, are discerning, and will try a number of different products before finding something that works. Once they find it, however, brand loyalty – whether for a shampoo or a particular salon – is extremely strong.

Producers differentiate themselves through their target demographic markets, price point and with different manufacturing processes. Products that promise no animal testing or that are all natural, for example, have loyal, niche markets and can often charge a premium.

Service providers compete primarily through price, location as well as their target demographic markets. Types of service and the related products that are offered are vital to profitability. Hair salons and barber shops, for example, rely on 5-15% of their revenue from hair care product sales. The beauty industry is known to be resistant to economic downturns – even faring well during the Great Recession of 2008. Though consumers tend to be more price conscious during those times, they do not stop spending. So in today’s environment of rising per capita incomes the beauty business is booming. In 2015 the industry generated $56.2 billion in the United States. Hair care is the largest segment with 86,000 locations. Skin care is a close second and growing fast, expected to have revenue of almost $11 billion by 2018. This growth is being driven in part by a generally increasing awareness of the importance of skin care, but also specifically due to an increase in the market for men.


According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there are nearly one million people employed in the primary service segments of the market, and there are strong growth expectations. Clearly this is an industry on the rise:

  • Barbers, hairdressers and cosmetologists: 656,000 in 2014, 10% expected growth by 2024.
  • Manicurists and pedicurists: 113,600 in 2014, 10% expected growth by 2024.
  • Skincare specialists: 55,000 in 2014 with a 12% expected growth by 2024. Specific growth expected for businesses serving men.
  • Massage therapists: 168,800 employed in 2014 with a whopping 22% growth by 2024!
  • Organic products & products produced in a sustainable (environmentally conscious) manner. Certainly a niche market for many years, but greater availability of information about the benefits – personal or global – are driving increased growth.
  • Products and services focused on our aging population. Said plainly – we have a large retired/retiring population, and many of them have money to spend.
  • Products and services focused on babies and young children. This is frequently related to the organic/sustainable movement above. In particular, millennial moms are willing to pay a premium to make sure their kids have the proper skin protection. Other franchises such as Cookie Cutters focus on providing an amazing experience for kids – turning a trip to get the tips trimmed into an adventure.
  • Men’s product and services – this trend is still relatively new but is expected to drive growth for years to come. Places like the Boardroom Salon claim to provide the ultimate relaxation experience for men while the Hair Saloon and 18/8 Men’s Hair Salon are reinventing the barbershop.And it is just the tip of the iceberg.It is estimated that 75% of men are not using any sort of facial skin care, but interest continues to grow.

As mentioned above, it’s important to remember that many beauty franchises derive up to 15% of their revenue from product sales; putting the right product on the shelves can make or break a business. Some manufacturers have a franchising distribution system of their own and even offer training programs, or partner with a particular service provider. With strong and growing demand, employment estimates through the roof to meet that demand and a strong history of being a steady business even in turbulent times, the beauty industry continues to provide fantastic opportunities.




Regis is closing SmartStyle salons in 600 Walmarts

Regis Corporation, the hair care chain based in Edina, has announced it will be closing 600 “nonperforming” Regis SmartStyle salons, which are located inside Walmarts, on Jan 31. It will leave it with 2,000 other salons, also located within Walmarts, with the decision being taken “to improve shareholder value and position the company for long-term growth.”  It’s not been announced yet which Smart Styles will close, with Regis saying it will offer stylists and managers jobs at other locations, as it intends to grow the salons it’s keeping.

According to the Regis website, there are currently 39 SmartStyle salons at Walmart locations in Minnesota. While the closing locations have not yet been revealed, it’s probable that at least some of those affected will be in Minnesota. Most of the state’s Smart-Style salons are found in Walmart’s outside of the Twin Cities. Salons in the metro area are located at Maple Grove, Blaine, Brooklyn Center, Burnsville, Lakeville and Shakopee Walmarts. The Business Journal notes that Regis’ move to close the company-owned locations comes after a period of months in which its sold 1,000 of its other salons to a private equity firm and hundreds more SmartStyle locations to franchisees. It comes despite Congress recently passing a tax bill that will cut corporate tax rates from 35 percent to 21 percent, which is expected to significantly reduce major companies’ bottom lines. But CEO Hugh Sawyer said the decision is “consistent with our multi-year strategic plan” that will allow it to grow its remaining salons.

Regis CEO Hugh Sawyer said that the closings of the “nonperforming” locations was another step in the company’s efforts to restructure its business. The company has been working to re franchise many of its company-owned stores and improve performance at the locations it’s holding onto. Regis splits its business between value-based brands, like Smart Style and Supercuts, and premium brands like Regis Salon. Sawyer took over as CEO last April, replacing Dan Hanrahan. Previously, Sawyer had worked at Chicago-based Huron Consulting Group, which Regis had hired to help it evaluate strategic moves for some of its salons. Since then, Regis has sold 1,000 salons to Los Angeles-based private equity firm Regent, sold hundreds of other SmartStyle locations to franchisees and closed other company-owned sites.

“Regis is committed to maintaining our leadership position in the salon industry,” Sawyer said in a statement. “As a result, we are making significant strategic and operational changes to our business to increase customer traffic, invest in new technologies, decrease non-strategic costs, expand our franchise capabilities and create a new Eco-system for customer interaction.” Regis said it doesn’t plan any further moves in its SmartStyle salon portfolio for the near future. It’s not clear how many employees will be affected; Regis said that it plans to offer many stylists and managers jobs at other locations. Regis ranked No. 25 on the Business Journal’s list of largest public companies in Minnesota last year with revenue of $1.75 billion. That revenue is expected to decline this year; prior to the latest round of closings, analysts had forecast 2018 revenue of about $1.25 billion.